Interracial/Multicultural

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“a heartfelt book that will definitely speak to many people who have had to navigate the cracks, fissures, and fault lines between radically different cultures across generations.”

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American Flygirl is an important story told in a simple straight-forward and concise way . . .”

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“a tale of cross-generational trauma and how greater world history can deeply affect individuals.”

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In The Manicurist's Daughter: A Memoir, Susan Lieu seeks to understand her Vietnamese immigrant mother, who died when Lieu was 11, and to reconcile her own identity as both part of, and in

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“Anna May’s is not exactly a rags-to-riches story, but it did start with dirty clothes, laboring as a young girl in her family’s laundry business in Los Angeles.

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A Kid’s Guide to the Chinese Zodiac is a must-have for anyone wanting to understand the Chinese culture . . .”

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“Nguyen is an intriguing, inventive, and perceptive writer and his mesmerizing memoir takes hold of us . . .”

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“The message is that there is room for everyone on the wall (or in the display case), and all of humanity needs to be represented in our venerable institutions.”

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New Women of Empire is never less than a fascinating read, and many of these chapter case studies could well be expanded for fuller publication.”

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Manifesting Justice will repay the very determined reader, and there are many shocking moments where the law is revealed to be, to an almost unbelievable extent, an ass.”

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“Migrations, if placed on the coffee table, may supersede the phone during a commercial break.

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The poems in A Sinking Ship Is Still a Ship are poetry as ode to the future of hidden, buried things, be they land, soon to be overcome by rising tides and disappeared, or memories of the

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“‘As the wedding approached, I could not stop thinking that I should be the bride.

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Learning a new language can be daunting, but Chineasy for Children makes it fun, if not exactly easy.

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“Told simply and well, Iftin’s story explains the incredible bravery and hope necessary to live in the crosshairs of war and to find a way out.”

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“The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and where the other begins?” Edgar Allan Poe

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Margot Lee Shetterly uses the repeating phrase, “really good” throughout this true story of four women working for NASA in the 1940s and beyond.

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Katja Petrowskaja has indeed, as her publicist claims, written an “inventive and unique literary debut” as she travels to various countries in search of her family’s dramatic 20th century history.

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The media has a hard time, even in documentaries, of presenting factually accurate history and especially so with movies.

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Life Interrupted provides eye-opening insights into the lives of almost invisible migrants forced to labor under inhuman conditions in o