Psychology

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“The premise that cognition and consciousness are traits that arise not solely from the brain but also involve the body, or soma (as in the common word ‘somatic’), is not new.”

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“show[s] us the panoply of underpinnings (psychological, sociological, philosophical, and biological) that support this fear of the new, the different, and the ‘other.’”

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Two things are generally true about self-help books for general readership:

—Sex sells

—Only well-written books significantly guide the reader to successfully help themselves

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With Pleasure [is] a book that can be beneficial to readers who have experienced trauma, readers who care about people who have experienced trauma, and readers who want to add mor

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The shiny cover of Psychology for Kids invites us in with greens, bright yellows, and purple. We open the book and see colorful gears on the white background end papers.

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“a book that is erudite, practical, reader-friendly, deeply personal, and sure to help even the most anxious among us.”

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“Authoritative, compassionate, and valuable, this book provides a fresh understanding of the many dangers of addiction . . .”

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The brain is most likely the center of our thought, our emotions, our communication, and other additional mental life. Unfortunately though, the brain is a difficult organ to study directly.

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“Bearing witness has never been more important. Cerotti and her grandmother are powerful guides as to why these Holocaust stories matter.”

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“provides both practical and clinical advice with an emphasis on improving Black Women’s emotional and physical health through trauma resolution, exercise, mindfulness, support systems, sel

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“Slingerland amuses and educates, not just about ethanol excess, but also the relevance for understanding guilty pleasures as a whole, in the present and in its ancient roots.”

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Jesse Singal says his “book is an attempt to explain the allure of fad psychology, why that allure is so strong, and how both individuals and institutions can do a better job of resisting it.”

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“‘Achieving lasting personality change means shaking things up, unlearning some of your many habits and routines that contribute to the kind of person you are, and overwriting them with new

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“The chapters on spite and freedom, politics and what is sacred to us are an insightful, relevant, and welcome commentary on what to make of our current hate-filled political climate.”

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“The aim of Useful Delusions, a very readable book, is to teach us to be more rational about our irrationality, to not make the latter our enemy, but to recognize how it may help a

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Trauma doesn’t develop only from violent incidents. It can manifest through institutional racism, the stress of cultural bias, or the isolation of pandemic.

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“The reader is left feeling thoroughly informed and deeply knowledgeable, newly created as a person with rich insight into the universe.”           

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“a campaign history from this war that is engaging, insightful, and compelling . . .”

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“If being told you’d kill yourself was not hitting bottom, what was? That changed nothing. He had been run over by a car. That changed nothing. He had been beaten until his brain bled.

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“The author knows that ‘to erase stigma, all of us—those in the medical community as well as laypeople—need to be less judgmental about mental illness in ourselves and in others and learn t

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“As a welcome surprise, Seven and a Half Lessons is part self-help book on how to manage our own quirky brains and part manifesto on how to move forward to heal this country’s poli

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In Better Boys, Better Men, Andrew Reiner convincingly details the harm males cause when on a quest to establish their hypermasculinity.

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“Written with humor and brutal honesty, Group is a bracing, confrontational, and absorbing read.”

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“Hats off to Gildiner for doing a heroic therapeutic job and for writing about it so eloquently.”

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