Psychology

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“provides both practical and clinical advice with an emphasis on improving Black Women’s emotional and physical health through trauma resolution, exercise, mindfulness, support systems, sel

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“Slingerland amuses and educates, not just about ethanol excess, but also the relevance for understanding guilty pleasures as a whole, in the present and in its ancient roots.”

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Jesse Singal says his “book is an attempt to explain the allure of fad psychology, why that allure is so strong, and how both individuals and institutions can do a better job of resisting it.”

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“‘Achieving lasting personality change means shaking things up, unlearning some of your many habits and routines that contribute to the kind of person you are, and overwriting them with new

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“The chapters on spite and freedom, politics and what is sacred to us are an insightful, relevant, and welcome commentary on what to make of our current hate-filled political climate.”

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“The aim of Useful Delusions, a very readable book, is to teach us to be more rational about our irrationality, to not make the latter our enemy, but to recognize how it may help a

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Trauma doesn’t develop only from violent incidents. It can manifest through institutional racism, the stress of cultural bias, or the isolation of pandemic.

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“The reader is left feeling thoroughly informed and deeply knowledgeable, newly created as a person with rich insight into the universe.”           

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“a campaign history from this war that is engaging, insightful, and compelling . . .”

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“If being told you’d kill yourself was not hitting bottom, what was? That changed nothing. He had been run over by a car. That changed nothing. He had been beaten until his brain bled.

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“The author knows that ‘to erase stigma, all of us—those in the medical community as well as laypeople—need to be less judgmental about mental illness in ourselves and in others and learn t

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“As a welcome surprise, Seven and a Half Lessons is part self-help book on how to manage our own quirky brains and part manifesto on how to move forward to heal this country’s poli

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In Better Boys, Better Men, Andrew Reiner convincingly details the harm males cause when on a quest to establish their hypermasculinity.

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“Written with humor and brutal honesty, Group is a bracing, confrontational, and absorbing read.”

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Livewired is a challenging and enlightening description of one of the greatest mysteries of our time: the brain and how it functions.”

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“Hats off to Gildiner for doing a heroic therapeutic job and for writing about it so eloquently.”

Author(s):
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Atlantic staff writer Olga Khazan tries to do much too much in her well-written, often absorbing work of memoir and reportage, Weird: The Power of Being an Outsider in an Insider World

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“The fact that the book is about so many other aspects of life beyond eating underscores the author’s premise that EDs are about so much more than food and size.”

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“The book is a lamentation on the fate of the post-World War II American Dream.”

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“Churchland’s take on conscience is likely messier than most of us will find comfort in, yearning as we do for moral clarity and certainty in order to make our decisions easier and put our

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Lithium provides the reader with an insightful look at the challenges facing the development of effective medications for the treatment of mental illness.”

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“This book is about what makes us vote as we do and keep coming back to this cultural ritual rain or shine, hell or high water.”

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“. . . today’s Americans are embracing a kaleidoscopic panoply of spiritual traditions, rituals, and subcultures from astrology and witchcraft to SoulCycle and the alt-right.”

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“. . . this book is a remarkably compassionate story of emotional family horror from which neither uncle nor niece could easily escape.”

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