Psychology

the authors hope the lived experiences here will boost our understanding of ‘how much courage it takes to endure the daily struggles for continued or improved mental healt

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“As interesting and enlightening as Sociopath is, there’s something disquieting about it.”

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“an exceptionally well-written, illustrated guide to understanding and improving mental health for tweens, teens, and young adults.”

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Practical Optimism is very solid in its ideas and methods—comprehensive in about every way, . . .”

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The Experience Machine How Our Minds Predict and Shape Reality by Andy Clark has a relatively simple yet amazing core tenet.

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Susannah Breslin is an accomplished journalist. She writes about sex and pornography. She produces documentaries and television series.

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“Together Vance and Smith debunk the myths that ‘therapy is only for white folks’ and ‘prayer is enough.’”

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I Must Be Dreaming is your ticket to the dreamland of a genius.”

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“Kissinger’s first book on family, mental illness, and recovery catapults her into the pantheon of modern, nonfiction writers who dare to feel, think, and unabashedly portray the agony of m

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“Making changes in the individualistic, hypercompetitive society is indeed a major enterprise.

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That Carriere manages to exceed those expectations and write with such clarity about the darkness that consumed much of her young adulthood is a gift . . .”

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“Glass writes a simple, honest, straightforward engrossing history of the epic scale of post-traumatic stress disorder during the First World War as studied in Craiglockhart Hospital near E

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Oh, for the days when the title “Working Girl” referred to the feel-good movie with Melanie Griffith.

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What is clear from Weil’s book is that history is not just a result of impersonal forces acting upon human decisions.

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“Through her own compelling personal story, Patrick's book will certainly illuminate an aspect of depression that is still little known and understood.”

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“Antrim’s memoir is indeed sad but also moving, insightful, and ultimately, for the writing of it, which is proof of survival, hopeful.”

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Dina Nayeri’s book centers on the immigration process for potential asylum seekers to the United States and to the UK.

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“Brightly written and well-researched, this book will appeal immensely to true-crime fans.”

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“madness can be both a teacher and a scourge, can be transformative, can place us in the company of visionaries like William Blake as well as the residents of Bedlam.”

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“The author’s goal is . . . to produce deep-seated, culture-wide transformation so that the judicial and community response is to the actual, not presumed, needs of survivors.”

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“insightful and inspiring and will remind you why relationships matter so much in our lives.”

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“a user friendly, practical guide that explains how to attain and maintain resilience by developing a learnable set of life skills that, with practice, become part of who we are and help us

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The author grew up in France near Lyon, the gastronomic capital of the world. Her parents were so focused on food and each other that she—an only child—felt like an outsider.

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