Arts, Artists & Photographers

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“Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing marks a unique milestone offering a generous souvenir of his extensive paper-based oeuvre, a miraculously well-preserved body

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Passing for Human is a compelling weaving of stories about author-illustrator Liana Finck's mother, her father, herself and how each of them has difficulties figuring out themselves, figur

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“Bill Cunningham was a New York institution, part of what made NYC the fashion capitol of the world.”

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“Forget your fishnet fantasies and take the rose out of your teeth,” Meghan Flaherty tells us in the prologue to her memoir Tango Lessons.

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By all appearances, the Bernsteins were a loving family.

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Van Gogh and the Seasons is everything one would want in a Vincent van Gogh monograph and much more.

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Salvador Dali wasn’t the founder of Surrealism, the cultural movement that spread from Europe to the Americas in the 20thcentury. Andre Breton was the founding father.

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Reviewers can’t seem to get enough of Middleton’s Double Vision.

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"Martin Kemp takes us on this great personal journey of adventure in exploring the art of Leonardo, and we are so much the better for it."

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The crescendo for Duncan Hannah’s Twentieth-Century Boy takes place in February 1976, more than 100 pages before the end, and four years before the legendary 1980 Times Square Show when hi

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Richard Avedon was the most famous fashion photographer in the world, but for much of his life struggled to be taken seriously as an art photographer.

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“this isn’t the usual tearjerker cancer story. It is a gleefully offensive cancer story. It is the Blazing Saddles of cancer stories.”

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In the Beat Generation tribe, Robert Frank was the odd man out.

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The way we conceive of art traditionally, and how it is intrinsically linked to drawing, design, and painting, owes its popularization, if not its origin, to Vasa

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Ink & Paint, The Women of Walt Disney’s Animation by Mindy Johnson corrects the misguided perception regarding women’s lack of contribution to the animation industry.

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“A corrective look at Leonardo’s first 27 professional years when he was snubbed, struggled, and departed Florence thwarted and penniless.”

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Of Dogs and Other People: The Art of Roy De Forest does a wonderful job of presenting both the person of Roy De Forest and the artwork he created.

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“a remarkable job of taming a wealth of loony and preposterous Dalian information into a fun, well presented, and entirely manageable package.”

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In The Pen and the Brush, the versatile biographer Anka Muhlstein explores some of the complex and fascinating relationships that have existed between painters and novelists.

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William Merritt Chase (1849–1916) is a pivotal figure in the history of American art. He was a contemporary of James Whistler and John Singer Sargent.

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Journalist Tom Di Nardo started his career as a freelance critic at the Philadelphia Bulletin as a side gig to his day job and was later a longtime contributor the Philadelphia Daily N

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Ross King does an exemplary job of bringing Claude Monet back to life.”

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