Cultural Affairs

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“We need anthropology now more than ever. As Ruth Benedict once noted prophetically, ‘The purpose of anthropology is to make the world safe for human difference.’”

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The Digital Plenitude: The Decline of Elite Culture and the Rise of New Media by Jay David Bolter is a book about exactly that: the decline of one thing and the rise of another.

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"D'Angour writes for a general audience without losing the reader or the subject of Socrates in Love: the complexities of Greek philosophy."

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“‘Florence received its greatest gift with the birth of Leonardo, and lost infinitely more with his death.’ Da Vinci was so much more than an artist; he brought sophistication and reverie t

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Art and Arcana offers glorious illustrations, fascinating backstories, and the occasional painful misstep of a franchise entering its 40th year.”

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“Throughout his moviemaking career, Hughes relentlessly worked the Hollywood system to fuel his ego, his libido, and his ambition, but in the end, he was undone by his own paranoia.

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The Columbus Museum of Art commemorates the centenary of The Harlem Renaissance with an exhibit titled I Too Sing America, which is also the title of the beautifully curated companion book

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Jay Sexton puts American history in a global perspective.

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In Pioneer Park in Dallas, past the statue of romantic cowboys and iconic longhorns, in a far corner of the park—a stone’s throw from the Kay Bailey Hutchison Conference Center—stands a monument.

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“Alice Sparberg Alexiou makes us miss the Bowery— more than we ever knew we could.”

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In Fifty Million Rising: The New Generation of Working Women Transforming the Muslim World Saadia Zahidi provides a welcome corrective to the dominant mage of “the tired story of the downt

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In Leftover in China: The Women Shaping the World’s Next Superpower, Roseann Lake, who worked at a television station in Beijing, provides us with a new angle on the usual narrati

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With its cover image of an eroticized version of Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring this book would draw the eye on any coffee table, though what this  image says in terms of Grace Banks’

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". . . a marvel-filled book."

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“Barry Brown’s revelatory work shows us a clear path of how to return to our natural, peaceful state of being.”

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“This is a must read for anyone concerned with escalating inequality globally and the potential of labor organizing in tandem with more humane corporate management for transforming communit

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She is a self-taught journalist, a natural detective, a Good Samaritan, and a woman with a mission. Her name is Gladys Kalibbala but the kids she saves call her Mommy or Auntie Gladys.

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“offer[s] a rare glimpse into the military establishment and how it treats people who are marginalized by the mainstream American public.”

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Although many consider that the modernist period of literature began just prior to the start of the 20th century and continued into the 1960s, and included many familiar names, it is the year 1922

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“They are unhinged, mentally ill, and represent a clear and present danger to the world.”

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Crossing the River Kabul is a memoir that reads almost like a diary. It is the real life account of Baryalai Popal, the son of one of Afghanistan’s premier families.

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The Instill and Inspire volume is a comprehensive presentation of works lovingly and intentionally brought together by an African American couple, for African American artists, on behalf o

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In recent times of rising Islamophobia, rampant misinformation about Islam, and political rhetoric against Muslims, books showcasing the positive aspects of Muslims in America are very welcome.

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Happy Anyway is a collection of short essays by current and past denizens of Flint, Michigan—the hometown of General Motors.

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