Authors

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“engaging, gossipy, and revealing—a look behind the curtain at the wondrous wizard of words. Fans will love it.”

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“A vivid and concise introduction to effective writing for students and professionals alike. . . .

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“Jonathan Alexander’s emphasis on what he envisions to be a unique narrative form detracts from what the book actually is—which is well worth a read.”

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“Poller’s Aldous Huxley offers readers a clear, thorough guide to Huxley’s metaphysical thought and the process through which it evolved over the course of his career as a writer.”

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“Like a foray into the heartbeat of a widely beloved author, These Precious Days by Ann Patchett is a powerful essay collection, wonderfully executed and deeply human.”

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While recovering from a serious stroke in 1995, British author, critic, and editor Robert McCrum found that the only words that made sense to him were bits of Shakespeare.

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“For sheer reading and reflecting pleasure, These Precious Days is a treasure.”

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The Writer’s Crusade is an important consideration of Kurt Vonnegut and the legacy of Slaughterhouse-Five.”

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A thoughtful and admiring account of a young British man’s rise from lackluster roots to world fame as a science fiction writer.”

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A splendid appreciation, from one master to another, written with great warmth, fervor, and intelligence.”

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Rebecca Solnit, the author of more than 20 books, might be called an eternal optimist, if not a Pollyanna. Apparently nothing has ever got her down, at least not for long.

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Oscar Wilde: A Life is elegantly written . . . Dense with detail, it draws the reader into Wilde’s milieu.

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“The Storytellers is a gift to aspiring writers of mysteries and thrillers, readers and fans, and academics alike. An instant classic . . .”

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“A masterful job of bringing Orwell’s complex personality and incredibly prescient thinking vividly to life.”

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“History at its finest, proving clearly how the past is very much part of the present.”

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“Borchert’s history is bound to appeal to readers interested in the American 1930s, the careers of noted writers, and the U.S.

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“Riley’s book is both an incisive examination of Sowell’s ideas and a tribute to a man of courage, brilliant intellect, fierce independence, and scholarly integrity.”

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Timothy Brennan begins his intellectual and political biography of Edward Said—the Palestinian American literary critic, gadfly, and largely self-appointed global diplomat—on a somber note.

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in Philip Roth: The Biography, Blake Bailey provides ample evidence of his understanding of modern American literature and the frailties and achievements of an ar

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If you have read only smaller portions of Dostoevsky, Christofi’s account will send you off to look for more.

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Hermione Lee’s biography of this celebrated playwright spans the six decades of his career.

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“Bury me north of the Mason-Dixon line, in a white suit and a plain coffin.” —Louise Fitzhugh

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“The little boy who dreamed of painting like Norman Rockwell ended up with his own art on the cover of The New Yorker. What could be more magical than that?

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“Souder’s biography is a stylistic portrait of a towering American original.”

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Leonard Cohen Untold Stories could not have happened before social media. Through Facebook, Google, and WhatsApp, Michael Posner located people who once knew Leonard Cohen and fell away.

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