Medical Writing

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There’s an old riddle that asks: What travels 12,000 miles but never goes anywhere? The answer: blood.

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In November 1849, Cambridge, Massachusetts, was very much a sleepy town run by Harvard University.

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The topic of death and dying has gripped the publishing world for the past several years.

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“In today’s trauma-focused society, PTSD: A Short History is a volume as brave as it is wise.”

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An authoritative tour of the brain. Groundbreaking research into how the brain processes information.

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“Although science is under siege,” Offit writes toward the end of the book, “science advocates are fighting back.”

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“I believe that the principal reason we are on this planet is to have our noses constantly rubbed in our obligation to care about people who are strangers to us.

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“Studies from the Holocaust have revealed how social death preceded physical death, tracing the creep of generalizations, exclusions and dehumanization of Jews that made mass murder possible.

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Also Human is a book about medical doctors.

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Why do some people see a dress as white and gold, while others insist the same dress is blue and black? You remember The Dress, right?

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“If ever a book were to be called magisterial, this one is.

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Maya Dusenbery has added immensely to the literature on women’s health in her important book Doing Harm by addressing the two biggest impediments to women getting good care: “The knowledge

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It’s often said there’s something “ineffable” about the nature of one’s mind on LSD, magic mushrooms, or other psychedelic plants or drugs.

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There are few people who could competently write The Biological Mind, but Alan Jasanoff is one of those individuals.

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Over the past five decades, leftist muckraker Barbara Ehrenreich has carved out a niche for herself as one of the nation’s most acidic and trenchant social critics.  Fortunately, she is also among

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One of the great myths in the religion of American literature celebrates the twisted wisdom of the alcoholic writer—the brazen artist who finds narrative meaning by washing his brain with a boozy e

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that in 2016, more than 64,000 Americans died from accidental opioid overdose.

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If you work with children, The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity by Nadine Burke Harris MD may be the most important book you read this year.

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As much memoir as about clinical medicine, Slow Medicine offers readers the sequel to her nonfiction masterpiece, God's Hotel (2012).

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Breathing regulates our everyday experience. What if we could change our lives by changing our breathing?

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"This book is an engrossing adventure about the rise of midwest America."

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Three of the most recognized letters in sport today are CTE, representing the brain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Dr.

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“The Vaccine Race shines a light over the transitional period of vaccine research.”

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“this book provides critical, factual information to families who feel alone and under-resourced, facing an impossible situation.”

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