Medical Writing

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Oliver Sacks was a “deeply eccentric” neurologist doing a “different sort of medicine on behalf of chronic often warehoused and largely abandoned patients.” Medical colleagues mostly ignored him.

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“Robin Marty and Jessica Mason Pieklo make clear that the likely end of Roe v Wade is at hand and involved more than the end of Roe.” 

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“beautifully identifies kindness as an endlessly renewable resource—the light we all can shine on the lives of others and in so doing bathe in its grace ourselves.”

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“the book is eminently worth reading for its compassion, research, and practical insight.”

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“We need a change in our healthcare system now.

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“you cannot be wise about the world around you if you cannot first know yourself.’

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In Pain is a fascinating and engrossing read for anybody who aspires to be an educated consumer of healthcare.

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“this book is highly recommended for a wide variety of readers, but especially to those who may have undergone trauma or the family members with whom they share their lives.”

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“Werb deftly captures the grim void of life among the disposable human detritus of a state governance apparatus more interested in its own power and enrichment than the lives and livelihood

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“Emotions are not positive or negative but must be used appropriately in situations—through neither under- nor overuse—to be effective.”

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“if the United States wants to cut health care costs, improve outcomes, and help patients take more ownership of their health, smart, AI-enabled medicine will need to be a top priority.”

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“After more than forty years as the physician, I was about to be the patient.”

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“Marijuana dependency is a real thing, and this book uses big data to highlight the shocking fact that ‘every day in 2014 almost 250 people showed up at emergency rooms all over the United

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“This is really a book about healthy ageing from the authors’ highly particular perspective—and it turns out that the fountain of youth is full of germs.”

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"Epilepsy, in particular, is all too often odder than the folklore that surrounds it."

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“Although When Death Becomes Life is about courage and innovation and dedication, it is foremost a book about hope.”

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“Influenza: The Hundred Year Hunt to Cure the Deadliest Disease in History is a highly engaging read.

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Why We Dream takes the reader on a tour of Western dream history and modern Western interpretation.

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There’s an old riddle that asks: What travels 12,000 miles but never goes anywhere? The answer: blood.

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In November 1849, Cambridge, Massachusetts, was very much a sleepy town run by Harvard University.

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The topic of death and dying has gripped the publishing world for the past several years.

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“In today’s trauma-focused society, PTSD: A Short History is a volume as brave as it is wise.”

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An authoritative tour of the brain. Groundbreaking research into how the brain processes information.

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