Poetry

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

A. E. Stallings’ reputation as a poet is already established. She has the distinction of being a McArthur Fellow (2011), that peculiar laurel that bestows “genius” on the recipient.

Reviewed by: 

“Buck’s poems are startling, insightful, and inscrutable. The reader may conjecture what the poems mean but without the comfort of ever knowing. That’s good poetry.”

Reviewed by: 

“The natural and gritty images paint dynamic landscapes that balance myth and reality.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Katie Ford’s fourth book, If You Have to Go is full of wounded, distrustful, deeply inward yet insistent verse that, from the very first line of the first poem, seems to push readers away—

Reviewed by: 

In the September 26, 2002, issue of The New York Review of Books, in an article rather marvelously entitled “The Queen of Quinkdom,” Margaret Atwood tackled Ursula K. Le Guin.

Reviewed by: 

“poems of balanced wildness and instinctual grace.”

Reviewed by: 

“littered with genuinely brilliant poems. They could lure disenchanted rationalists back to poetry. They might ignite a new movement in a culture. They are wonderful.”

Reviewed by: 

“This is a small but beautiful book and one that deserves to be cherished.

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“strong poetry.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Whether it’s God or fate or karma or randomness, how should we respond when life skewers us with loss and cruel reshaping of dreams into walking nightmares?

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

When reading the other reviews of Barnett’s Human Hours, one begins to wonder if the reviewers actually read it.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“These poems glow with interiority—profound, intense, spiritual.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Stanger on Earth by Richard Jones is a collection of personal poems inspired by landscapes, ranging from Virginia to Italy, and beyond.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In Rembrandt’s painting, Still Life with Two Dead Peacocks and a Girl, a child leans in the window, smiling, looking at everything the rich world has to offer her, including a bowl of frui

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“a brilliantly moving book.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“readers will enjoy its original, ironic, satirical, and often humorous poems.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Part backlash, part meditation, Nature Poem by Tommy Pico is an urban hipster’s struggle to write on a subject he feels is “stereotypical, reductive, and boring.” The poem’s power arises f

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Carol Muske-Dukes opens her eighth collection of poems with a vision of life seen all the more radiant for its closeness to death.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

"[Kooser's] craft is to be cherished in a world where contemporary poetry, especially visual poetry, is frequently misunderstood."

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Brenda Hillman has never gone gentle into any good night. She’s been a firebrand, especially in the last two decades, flying to Washington D.C.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Even the prose a poet writes is poetry; for sure, that is true about Henri Cole’s latest book, Orphic Paris. The book pretends to be prose, but it is poetry carved in paragraphs.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Linda Pastan’s new collection, A Dog Runs Through It, is about the poet’s ownership and lifetime admiration of dogs, not only as pets but also as friends and teachers.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In We, the Almighty Fires, Anna Rose Welch proves yet again that sex and religion are always the best topics for poetry.

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

When I signed up to review Brown: Poems, I had no intimation that Kevin Young, the author of the poems, had lived in Topeka, Kansas, attended the local public schools, and took poetry less

Reviewed by: 

Violent, erotic, dreamlike, and weird: words that only scratch the surface in attempting to describe The Absolute Gravedigger, by Vítěslav Nezval. Mr.

Pages