Poetry

Reviewed by: 

“There is a realization that comes with reading Trees: that while the collection brings with it an appreciation of Hesse’s work, each essay, each poem can be taken away and treasur

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

If you live in Poetry World, you’ve been hearing about Zeina Hashem Beck’s O for a while now.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In his 1999 book The Age of Spiritual Machines Ray Kurzweil, inventor of the reading machine for the blind, explored the possibility of a world when the AI creations of our future were not

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“so important to an understanding of American thought and the landscape that formed it.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

There’s something magical about the number 13: there are 13 stripes on the American flag, 13 is a prime and therefore indivisible number, in the Jewish calendar a leap year has 13 months and Steven

Reviewed by: 

“Through his poems, Wasson has unearthed the buried bones of generations and brought their lives into the daylight.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Levin has written a book of adjustments—one that nearly resembles a sort of Delphic handbook on the transformation of self-concept.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In his Biloxi Blues, Neil Simon’s stand-in character (nervous about the loss of his impending virginity) asks his comrades in arms why, after a person has made love for the first time, the

Reviewed by: 

The other day a new video emerged from Ukraine of shelling in an apartment project—reporters and grandmothers dash for cover as large, pressure-sucking booms roar through the cement canyon of the c

Reviewed by: 

Time Is a Mother is a true magic trick. The message made into shapes sharp with meaning, . . .”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Throughout The Spring, Connole’s experience of grief, translated into prose and photographs, creates a spare, rugged alchemy.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Sharif masterfully blends, develops, and transforms her imagery throughout Customs in such a seamless and unexpected way that the reader effortlessly follows these gorgeous, golde

Reviewed by: 

“This is a remarkable little book with a poignant political and social message that should be read by everyone who cares about this country.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

New York Journal of Book’s editor, Lisa Rojany, forbids its writers from the first person.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“For those who think ‘nature poetry’ should be an escape from the human world, Hays provides a much-needed corrective, consistently reminding the reader that humans are nature, too, that wh

Reviewed by: 

“What if death is just the beginning of life?” With that question, author Laura Formentini dives into an exploration of loss that will ultimately help her heal from the feelings evoked by her son’s

Reviewed by: 

“an eminently readable, even compelling collection.”

Reviewed by: 

“Will Alexander’s cascade of images, esoteric musings, Egyptology, scientific contemplations, astronomy, biology, historical injustices, and contemporary African politics swirl in this free

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Maggie Smith’s poetry collection Goldenrod emerges from a place of stillness.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Simonovis’ succinct work and powerful lexicon carry the painful images of the hyper-reality of a totalitarian regime.

Reviewed by: 

What do you do when the world refuses to look at you, to really see you? When, still, your life is expendable if the smallest excuse for taking it can be conjured?

Reviewed by: 

“the kind of poetry that can make a reader wince with delight.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

We were, all of us, at one time not alive, which makes it strange that we should wonder, so widely and so often, what it will be like to be not alive again.

Reviewed by: 

“For Gervitz, Migrations is both a life’s work and a memory palace, a narrative pilgrimage through the lens of her own experience that is both alive and dead, both past and future.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

From the first pages of The How: Notes on the Great Work of Meeting Yourself, Yrsa Daley-Ward lets us know that there is no right way to read this book.

Pages