Journalism

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Ben McGrath has a journalist's nose for news and telling details and a novelist's ability to tell a suspenseful story with vivid portraits of ordinary people such as Richard Conant, who did extraor

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The letterpress is a haunting object. Its small bed and moveable type have an obvious kinship with Gutenberg’s 1440 creation.

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Full Disclosure: This is not an ordinary review. It’s personal.

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“Vivid, moving, revealing, and highly readable, The Helpers deserves a high place on the Covid-19 bookshelf.”

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“This book is for art lovers, and lovers of beauty and truth who value the human spirit that will not be denied by the destructive forces that humans have created.

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“A Poetics of the Press serves an audience of those dedicated to recording and understanding literary publishing, a must for all serious libraries.”

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“a powerful narrative of WWII news, journalistic ethics, and women’s achievements in the face of daunting odds.”

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“We Are Bellingcat reveals the power within each one of us to pierce the walls of disinformation and learn the truth about what’s happening out there.”

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The role of the news establishment and the American newspaper has undergone several profound transformations in American history.

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In Better Boys, Better Men, Andrew Reiner convincingly details the harm males cause when on a quest to establish their hypermasculinity.

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Slanted is Attkisson’s most recent effort to expose the biases and corruption in the mainstream media even as she laments ‘the death of the news as we once knew it.’”

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Michael Oberman was the music columnist at the daily Washington Star, taking over from his older brother, Ron, from February 1967 to March 1973.

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A sobering, scarifying account that leaves the reader exhausted and in awe at the author’s endurance during these ritual gatherings of the MAGA tribe.”

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“Although there are times when Chong gets a bit wordy and perhaps repetitive, her overall take on book reviewers and their work is well organized and informative.

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“An estimated 30 million people died under Stalin’s regime of terror. These nine women show us how they avoided being among them. Their voices inspire us all . . .”

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Broadside: A Feminist Review was a “groundbreaking” Canadian feminist newspaper published between 1979 and 1989.

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“The combat photographers whose stories are told in this book occupy a unique place in the history of the war, both chronicling and participating in some of the major actions of the war whi

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“Michael Serazio has done a remarkable analysis, and this book offers any student of American culture and sport much to contemplate.

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Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez died in 2014 at age 87, a Nobel Prize winner, admired as one of the finest novelists of the 20th century.

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“In 2014, Roger Angell was in Cooperstown at the Baseball Hall of Fame to receive the J. G.

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“exposes violence in art, literature, thought, music, opera, movies, sports, love, landscapes, and in intellect itself.”

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“Stability is out, revolution is in, so are the Islamists, identity politics are a jumble, women and their bodies remain repressed, violence or its threat is endemic, corruption is all arou

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Shortly after he was inaugurated, President Donald Trump tweeted that the press was the “enemy of the people” because, he claimed, they made up news.

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Battles over newspaper coverage of the Mormon church date back to the earliest years of the most persecuted and persistent cult in American religious history.

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Who Shot Sports is an engrossing photo exhibition between covers that more than proves the truism that a picture is, indeed, worth a thousand words.

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