Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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This spring has seen the publication of the 360th edition from The Library of America, in a sense completing, at least for now, the full circle of the history of American literature.

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In 1997, one bad decision environmental science writer and adventurer Jon Turk made during his 25 years of backcountry skiing triggered an avalanche that nearly did to him what kayaking and sailing

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This well-written book affords the reader an unobstructed view of the inner workings of the clumsy governmental machine named the FBI.

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“Cancel my subscription to the resurrection/
Send my credentials to the house of detention/
I got some friends inside.”
—The Doors (“When the Music’s Over”)

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Not too many autobiographies begin with the author sliding down the birth canal.

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The title of this riveting book comes from Robert Johnson’s blues song, “Hellhound on My Trail,” which is about being pursued by fate, by the law, and ultimately, death.

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We should all know who Michael J. Fox is. He was the smart, financially driven whiz kid in the TV show “Family Ties.” He played Marty McFly in Back to the Future.

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For the better part of this year, newspapers, magazines, the blogosphere, radio, TV, and bookstores have been filled with analyses of how President Obama squandered his initial popularity by pushin

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“Fenway Park, in Boston, is a little lyric bandbox of a ballpark,” begins the tale of Red Sox slugger Ted Williams’ final at bat on September 28, 1960, at the oldest major league baseball stadium c

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After all the pain of recession that we’ve been through, it’s a bit hard to remember that there was once a dot-com boom era in which high-tech startups found it amazingly easy to find financing, an

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There are a few lucky souls who come into this world knowing exactly what they are supposed to do with their lives. Michael Jordan was always meant to be a basketball player.

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“Better bring your own redemption when you come/
To the barricades of Heaven where I’m from . . .”
—Jackson Browne

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Of all the human gifts this reviewer most envies, the ability to fluently translate languages has always been uppermost.

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Reading a book about the art of writing by horror master Stephen King is like sitting down with your favorite uncle to talk about how to fix cars.

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A month before he left this life in 1989 at the age of 101, yoga master Sri Tirumalai Krishnamacharya told author A. G. Mohan what is most important in life: “Arogya. Ayus.

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The “recovered alcoholic fighting to stay sober” tale is not new territory, so Burroughs isn’t sharing something new with his readers.

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The words “Armenia” and “bittersweet” have been a natural pairing for the people of that country and its diaspora.

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 (Little, Brown and Company, September 2006) The Beautiful Fall has been classified “pop culture” but it is more much a chronicle of the parallel lives of two of the most famous designers of

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It's not often we get to hear the story from the victim of a serial killer as we do in this sensitively written account of Sanford Clark, the nephew of serial killer Gordon Stewart Northcott.

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Few works of art (or artists) have those special sparks that give them staying power. Some flare brightly for a moment, but then are lost to the relentless march of time.

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This historically accurate book, a real gift to children, explains the effective and admirable life of Effa Manley, the first important female baseball clubowner.

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In his Holocaust memoir, My Three Lives, Phillip Markowicz bears witness to the countless innocent lives whose flames were extinguished for their “racial impurity,” as defined by Nazi laws

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When they literally were “just kids,” Patti Smith, poet and rock star, and Robert Mapplethorpe, photographer and sexual provocateur, showed signs of the artists they would eventually become.

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The rich may be different from you and me, but that doesn’t mean they are any more interesting.

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