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Harbinger is a reminder of something we all too commonly lose track of: the idea of poetry as an art form.

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“Glück has created a pièce de résistance. This is a collection of poetry not just worth reading. It is worth tasting, reviewing, scenting, savoring.”

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In his 1999 book The Age of Spiritual Machines Ray Kurzweil, inventor of the reading machine for the blind, explored the possibility of a world when the AI creations of our future were not

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If you live in Poetry World, you’ve been hearing about Zeina Hashem Beck’s O for a while now.

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“so important to an understanding of American thought and the landscape that formed it.”

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There’s something magical about the number 13: there are 13 stripes on the American flag, 13 is a prime and therefore indivisible number, in the Jewish calendar a leap year has 13 months and Steven

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“Through his poems, Wasson has unearthed the buried bones of generations and brought their lives into the daylight.

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“Levin has written a book of adjustments—one that nearly resembles a sort of Delphic handbook on the transformation of self-concept.”

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In his Biloxi Blues, Neil Simon’s stand-in character (nervous about the loss of his impending virginity) asks his comrades in arms why, after a person has made love for the first time, the

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The other day a new video emerged from Ukraine of shelling in an apartment project—reporters and grandmothers dash for cover as large, pressure-sucking booms roar through the cement canyon of the c

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Time Is a Mother is a true magic trick. The message made into shapes sharp with meaning, . . .”

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Throughout The Spring, Connole’s experience of grief, translated into prose and photographs, creates a spare, rugged alchemy.”

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“This is a remarkable little book with a poignant political and social message that should be read by everyone who cares about this country.”

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New York Journal of Book’s editor, Lisa Rojany, forbids its writers from the first person.

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“an eminently readable, even compelling collection.”

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Maggie Smith’s poetry collection Goldenrod emerges from a place of stillness.

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“Simonovis’ succinct work and powerful lexicon carry the painful images of the hyper-reality of a totalitarian regime.

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We were, all of us, at one time not alive, which makes it strange that we should wonder, so widely and so often, what it will be like to be not alive again.

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From the first pages of The How: Notes on the Great Work of Meeting Yourself, Yrsa Daley-Ward lets us know that there is no right way to read this book.

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this densely rich book, which places Harrison among the pantheon of our best American poets, will make readers wish in the coming years that he could still send more poems

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In her 11th poetry collection, Bestiary Dark, Marianne Boruch goes back to Pliny the Elder, who asked, “The world, is it finite?” The answer is both no and yes.

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“Kirby has created a book that is also a lit picture window into a world that looks a lot like this one, but is infinitely kinder, more gentle, more full of awe and wonder and love . .

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This is a terrific book. You’re going to love it.”

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Anya Krugovoy Silver (1968–2018) died after enduring cancer for several years.

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“In Imagine Us, The Swarm, Muriel Leung takes risks experimenting with non-traditional literary resources to show us the challenges faced by an immigrant family and alienation felt

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