Military History & Affairs

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“Korda writes that the tragedy of the First World War can best be understood not by reading histories, but rather by reading the poems, letters, diaries, and memoirs of the men who fought i

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By the end of World War II, the U.S. Navy was the foremost maritime power, eclipsing Britain’s Royal Navy. However, at the end of 1942, the U.S.

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During World War II, more than 600 United States planes were lost ferrying supplies between India and China.

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“Nelson keeps the prose lively with intimate storytelling . . .”

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“an engaging and sometimes surprising analysis of the changing nature of mercenary warfare and how these soldiers of fortune continue to play a significant role in many of the world’s ongoi

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All these case studies are extremely well-written and offer a variety of unique and common lessons learned for future study.”

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“Haunted War Tales is good reading, made all the better that so much of it is different and unfamiliar to even the niche reader of strange history and tales, but a

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“Sea power will remain a vital tool of national power, and Mahan remains one of the foremost thinkers on the strategic purpose of naval forces to meet national objectives.”

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In this short book filled with drawings and photographs, Edward Ward tells a concise technical service history of the Spitfire, what he describes as the “most important British aircraft of all time

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“The author’s conclusions on the long-term effect of the intervention on Russia’s current internal political and foreign policy viewpoint is fascinating.”

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While you should never judge a book by its title, if Jeff Vandenengel had gone with Too Big to Sail, then you can imagine the book could have courted a wider audience.

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With the media focused on the bombing of civilians in Ukraine and Gaza, revisiting the use of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and its impact on the civilian population, seems timely.

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The book is replete with maps, photographs, profiles of commanders and weapons, and illustrations that help explain the brutal combat in a region that another historian ha

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"a model for good history writing . . . a welcome guide to critical thinking along with a compelling story."

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in the end, war will be waged by politicians and generals (and admirals) and the troops they command, and military operations will continue to have political implications.

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“In Nazis on the Potomac, Sutton tells the incredible previously secret story of an institution where Americans listened and learned the lessons needed to win World War II.”

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“Reeves' book is more than an intimate study of Grant and his family in a critical period of the future president’s life; it is a study of a white middle-class America in which economics, p

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“Shay remembers a hero of the colonial wars and American independence who is too often relegated to a footnote in the shadow of the better-remembered leaders of the Revolution.”

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“Uniting Against the Reich is Truxal’s first book, and it is based on solid research, sound if debatable judgments, and a refreshing lack of moralistic tone.”

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a 50-year perspective of how the Navy rose to the operational challenge of navigating in an unforgiving environment against a determined foe.”

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“Well done atlases are invaluable tools for studying history and this volume hits all the right notes, providing not only a wealth of information but a concise and well wri

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The Race for the Atom Bomb is less the story of how the Soviet Union stole the secrets of the Manhattan Project as it is a defense of J.

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