Military History & Affairs

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The Mosquito Bowl is not just a book about war. It is, instead, about the men who fought that war.

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“The Wise Gals who started at the CIA paved the way for the many women coming after them and still provide an inspiring model.

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During WWII the Germans had about 1,000 prisoner of war camps, holding 170,000 British military alone. The number of stories that could be told is enormous.

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“Historian James Scott’s new book about the firebombing of Tokyo and other Japanese cities in the spring and summer of 1945 restores LeMay to his rightful place in the pantheon of great Ame

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The Facemaker proves an absorbing story of a remarkable surgeon rising to the demands of the most horrifying wounds of modern warfare.”

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“An excellent introductory or reference volume for the novice history student beginning the study of military history . . .”

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“Brendan Simms and Steven McGregor in their new gripping account of the battle, The Silver Waterfall, show that while luck played a part in the battle’s outcome, victory a

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“You learn a lot, change a few long-held assumptions.

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“Michael Gordon provides a masterful combination of strategic analysis, a study of command, and a combat narrative to create a comprehensive and at times disturbing account of the fight aga

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“The author makes this solid work of scholarship the sort of book that starts a young person’s love of reading and interest in history.”

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“an excellent tale of the coming of age for America’s victorious World War II Army.”

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“America’s Rise and Fall Among Nations is a stinging critique of America’s foreign policy establishment and its Progressive ‘ruling class’ since 1910, and Codevill

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a spellbinding work that will serve James D. Hornfischer’s legacy well.”

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“Jonathan Clements’ new book Japan at War in the Pacific is a lucid history of the rise and fall of militarism in Japan . . .”

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The author of this book, veteran terrorism expert Nelly Lahoud of the New America Security Program, sifted through 96,000 declassified files (and 6,000 Arabic pages) seized from Osama bin Laden’s c

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“This gorgeous watercolor-illustrated one-volume history of the rise of American naval power in World War II captures the desperate struggle of war at sea and its pivotal importance for the

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“Blood and Ruins: The Last Imperial War, 1931–1945 stands apart for its unique observations and analysis of the war, focusing much more on both its origins and effects while scruti

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“This is a magnificent tale of personal courage, combat leadership, and heroism under fire.

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“a careful and splendidly written narrative that separates known facts from long-believed myths and outright falsehoods about events leading up to the battle, the battle itself, and its aft

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“Ways and Means represents nonfiction writing at its best, using an easy prose to enlighten with thought provoking, sometimes controversial, ideas from the very beginning.”

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“This handy little guide helps in choosing which Civil War sites to visit.”

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“The Great War and the Birth of Modern Medicine could stand as a solid highly readable history of World War I, even ignoring its important contribution to the history of the advanc

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well suited for a short introductory volume for this air campaign, with multiple charts, graphs, diagrams, and tables showing the major weapons on both sides, how the camp

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“I spent 33 years and 4 months in active service as a member of out country’s most agile military force—the Marine Corps. . . .

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“Despite the many, many books on Abraham Lincoln, books such as this one bring us the closest to the real man.”

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