Military History & Affairs

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“The 50th anniversary . . . should be retold as a tribute to these long forgotten heroes that answered their county’s call in this controversial war.”

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“Anatomy of a Genocide furnishes well-lit imagination, though shaded with sadness, beneficial for the communities trapped into mutual impairment in various parts o

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“No American city was more important to Nazis than Los Angeles; home to Hollywood, the greatest propaganda machine in the world.

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The Vietnam War was one of the most tragic and divisive events in the history of this country.

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The nuclear weapon missile business is contradictory, full of missteps, highly dangerous and prepared in its madness (Mutually Assured Destruction, aka MAD, they used to call it in Cold War days) t

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“should be required reading for anyone trying to understand or decipher the potential direction of war and conflict in what has already began as a violent and unpredictable century . .

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“sets the standard for a single volume military history text on the American Revolution.”

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Anna Feigenbaum’s Tear Gas: From the Battlefields of WWI to the Streets of Today is a poignant inquiry into the relationship between a corporate-capitalist system of governing and its implic

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In times of conflict, not everything is about what goes on in the front lines.

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“Kotkin’s exhaustive research, careful historical judgments, shrewd insights, and splendid writing . . .”

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does an excellent job of placing World War II in the historical context of global conflict . . .”

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“fully justifie[s] the remark of General Alan Brooke that Britain should ‘thank God . . . that occasionally such supermen exist on this earth.’”

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“The agenda of many combat photographers is either ideological—an attempt to save the world by bringing to light the suffering of war’s victims—or aesthetic—getting that perfect combination of comp

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Biographer James Thomas Flexner has called George Washington the “indispensable man” of the American Revolution.

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It is easy to make war and very hard to make peace. The experience of the Allies after the Great War shows that a flawed peace will only lead to more war.

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“provides a fresh perspective on the strategic options each combatant faced as the once European war became truly global in 1941 . . .”

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“offer[s] a rare glimpse into the military establishment and how it treats people who are marginalized by the mainstream American public.”

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“books like this remind us of the human cost of war and the sacrifices made by soldiers who answered their country’s call . . .”

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“offers an excellent synthesis and new insights not previously considered on Allied strategy and operational planning . . .”

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More often than not, when one thinks of the actions taken against the various categories of Europe’s “undesirables” in World War II, it is usually in terms of the Axis: Germany and, to a lesser ext

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“Rajsfus implicitly warns us that there will be many fellow travelers who will follow Trump through the swamp in order to wreck the American experiment.”

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“The irony of DARPA is that even as its mandate has shrunk, its reputation has ballooned.”

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