Military History & Affairs

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“Wars are not won by evacuations,” remarked Winston Churchill after 338,226 British and French soldiers were safely transferred from the beaches at Dunkirk to England in late May-early June 1940.

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John Hendrix tells a very complicated story in tracing Dietrich Bonhoeffer's journey of faith in Nazi Germany. The graphic format serves him well as he intersperses dense text passages with art.

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“a tale of bravery, courage, and sacrifice . . .”

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It has been asked before, regarding topics which have previously received considerable attention from the publishing world: Is it really necessary for another book on this subject?

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“long overdue update to a tragic and avoidable Allied debacle, which continues to offer stark lessons on the dangers of hubris and substituting optimism for solid operational planning.”

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In the 2018 edition of Hezbollah, first published in 2007, Boston University professor Augustus Richard Norton adds new chapters on the complex dynamics of the Syrian war involving the Uni

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“not a lot of books that can be said to change the historiography of events, but this stands as one of them . . .”

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When the first major contingent of conventional U.S.

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In medieval times, uncharted areas on maps were often marked “Here there be dragons,” but there are no records of what dragons may have been encountered, because there were no survivors to tell the

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“These are the times that try men’s souls,” wrote Thomas Paine, and his pamphlet is as instructive today as it was in 1776.

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In 1346 Edward of Woodstock commanded the frontline at the Battle of Crécy, his father King Edward III of England, intentionally left him unsupported to win the battle, so he could “earn his spurs”

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“wonderful photos and illustrations make this book entertaining . . .”

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It is always a pleasure to read and review a publication that deserves one’s endorsement. This volume has a lot going for it that will be referenced below.

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“thought provoking exploration of the legal and moral roots of the rebellion that created our country . . . a timely and fascinating book.”

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If there is a single military operation of retribution better known in the history of World War II than the so-called Doolittle Raid, one would be hard pressed to come up with an example.

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There are few topics more controversial in modern American life than the right of citizens to own firearms.

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“describes the sweeping changes to England’s economy, government, culture, and influence in Europe . . .”

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In New Orleans, a sturdy column once capped by a bronze figure of Confederate General Robert E. Lee reaches into the sky.

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“offers some compelling insights on how to better handle these small wars . . .”

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“offers a sobering historical analysis of these groups . . .”

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J. D. Dickey’s new book Rising in Flames could be subtitled A Politically Correct Guide to Sherman’s March. It is equal parts social history and military history.

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Many authors are currently interested in Adolf Hitler’s rise to power.

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There has always been a dash of romance when it comes to Royal Air Force of Great Britain.

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“leaves behind a legacy as one of the Army’s most influential innovators . . .”

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"Hollywood makes movies about battles, helicopters, and daring escapes in the Vietnam War.

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