Biography & Memoirs

Reviewed by: 

“I didn’t start out with grievances against the world, but the world certainly seemed to have grievances against girls and women like me. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Williams reflects . . . on an issue contentious for feminists and other women, namely her sexuality: ‘And one last thing.

Reviewed by: 

“In editing and republishing Ethel’s Love-Life, Christopher Looby has demonstrated how profoundly ahead of her time Margaret Sweat could be.

Reviewed by: 

“The archetypal Valentine, summoned up for the person who has never met her, appears trousered, not merely trousered but actually cross-dressed, as she perceived herself, and this is how she remain

Reviewed by: 

“[A] fascinating, beautifully written memoir . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“Sylvia Beach, Bryher, Natalie Barney, and Gertrude Stein—all rebelled against outworn art and attitudes.

Reviewed by: 

“Bury me north of the Mason-Dixon line, in a white suit and a plain coffin.” —Louise Fitzhugh

Reviewed by: 

“Drinking was a group hobby . . . Food, its accoutrements, and above all the sensuous pleasures of eating formed the leitmotif of his life.”

Reviewed by: 

Chasten Buttigieg does have a story to tell and he does it well in his new book, I Have Something to Tell You: A Memoir.

Reviewed by: 

“Anne Lister is considered to be the first ‘modern’ lesbian.”

“I am an enigma, even to myself, and I do excite my own curiosity.” —Anne Lister, June 21, 1824.

Reviewed by: 

In the early ’90s, novelist Paul Lisicky was awarded back-to-back literary fellowships that brought him to Provincetown, RI, one of a group of colleagues paid to nurture their craft.

Reviewed by: 

“‘We are not the first generation of queer people to have found ourselves trapped in a straight marriage,’ he writes, ‘but please God, let us be the last.’ Books like his will help that pra

Reviewed by: 

Rainbow Warrior is an engaging read. It is funny, poignant, painful, and triumphant. It is never less than entertaining.”

Reviewed by: 

Born in the forties and raised an only child in a middle class family in the fifties’ South, Peggy Caserta grew up in an era in which girls received little education and then worked only until they

Reviewed by: 

“Sooner or later, we have to venture beyond our biological family to find our logical one, the one that actually makes sense for us.

Reviewed by: 

"The big surprise about David Sedaris’s new book, Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977–2002), is how very good it is."

Reviewed by: 

Last year, journalist Michelangelo Signorile’s It’s Not Over detailed how the right wing and some religious groups were working feverishly with antigay organizations to attack any pro-gay

Reviewed by: 

The travails experienced by transgender persons in the United States are receiving an increasing amount of publicity.

Reviewed by: 

The plight of homeless LGBT youth seldom gets the attention it deserves. Ryan Berg’s book No House to Call My Home is one man’s attempt to remedy that situation.

Reviewed by: 

Writer Dale Peck was a journalism student at Columbia University when he joined ACT-UP at the height of the AIDS epidemic.

Reviewed by: 

“In the Spring of 2012 a new novel from Edmund White entitled Jack Holmes and His Friend, is upcoming. The reader hopes that with this new work of fiction Mr.

Pages