Historical

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature calls Moby-Dick “the closest approach the U.S.

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Russia, to paraphrase Winston Churchill, is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. The key to understanding Russia, however, lies in her history.

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Stories about history are listed in the nonfiction category, but the classification is misleading. Historical facts are not neutral truths awaiting discovery and exposition.

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The Most Wanted Man in China is Fang Lizhi’s memoir, written in 1989 but not published until now, four years after his death.

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“Rublack creates an astute and informative study of witchcraft and witch trials.”

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“[S]he wrote, ‘I do not desire ecstatic, disembodied sainthood . . . I would be human, and American, and a woman.’”

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In the 19th century there were many individuals who could be considered larger than life, particularly in the United States.

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More Was Lost is a memoir of two parts; the first reads like a fairy tale and the second like a nightmare.”

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“a well-written, family memoir that tackles broad questions of identity . . .”

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Fans of Verdi's opera La Traviata and readers who enjoy biographies of courtesans won't want to miss this gem by Rene Weis, a regular contributor to the Royal Opera House programs.

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Enough books appear on individual race-hatred-based lynching in the South to constitute a genre.

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On September 18, 1931, the Regensburger Echo ran a front-page article, “Suicide in Hitler's Apartment.” The body of Geli Raubal, Hitler's niece, was found with a single gunshot wound to th

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Prior to David A. Bell’s new work, detailed investigations of the “life and times of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769–1821)” did not evoke notions of a short, slim volume.

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The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel: A Story of Marriage and Money in the Early Republic by Margaret A.

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“read this book to truly understand how this dynamic duo formed a loving and unprecedented marriage and intellectual partnership . . .”

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“a shocking and uncomfortable spin on the usual historiography of 1944 as the year the Allies decisively turned the war toward victory.”

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“carefully crafted, readable, honest, and concise work.”

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“In this intricate and intimate journey Rita Gabis brings macrocosmic Holocaust horror into the microcosm of our dining rooms, kitchens, and bedrooms—a noble feat, one you will not soon for

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“May we find the courage . . . to make this land . . . a more just, more reasonable, and more tolerant place.”

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Napoleon: a Life is an epic biography by a popular writer who has done the “on the ground work” needed to make the latest of the thousands of biographies of Napoleon something new.

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In his book The Cost of Courage author Charles Kaiser brings the horror of existing in occupied France during World War II front and center.

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“Seyler conveys excitement and adventure from a lost story of a pioneer explorer of the Middle East.”

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Writer Dale Peck was a journalism student at Columbia University when he joined ACT-UP at the height of the AIDS epidemic.

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