Historical

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Nobody’s Son is the culmination of a family’s gradual demise.

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William F. Buckley, Jr. led an extraordinary life.

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In the spring of 1861, scant months after the secession of the southern states and the commencement of the Civil War, the United States government was faced with a crisis of logistics.

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Drink it in with a cup of Earl Grey Tea on a cold winter evening.”

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“Christine Negroni uses her experience and broad knowledge of air disasters to summarize and integrate investigations.”

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“This is history, through the glass darkly, with all the attendant perils of the great darkness that was the Holocaust in Poland, both during and after the Second World War and in the decades of co

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And with every day that passes you become poorer within, the internal frost becomes sharper, the heart hardens. Yes, you are alive.

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Pioneer CIA director and espionage historian Allen Dulles famously wrote that more spy craft commonly went on in any Italian city state in the Renaissance than in the whole of the relatively modern

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There has been a revival of interest in the life and career of General Douglas MacArthur, perhaps because the United States has “pivoted” to the Asia-Pacific in its current foreign policy.

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature calls Moby-Dick “the closest approach the U.S.

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Russia, to paraphrase Winston Churchill, is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. The key to understanding Russia, however, lies in her history.

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Stories about history are listed in the nonfiction category, but the classification is misleading. Historical facts are not neutral truths awaiting discovery and exposition.

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The Most Wanted Man in China is Fang Lizhi’s memoir, written in 1989 but not published until now, four years after his death.

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“Rublack creates an astute and informative study of witchcraft and witch trials.”

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“[S]he wrote, ‘I do not desire ecstatic, disembodied sainthood . . . I would be human, and American, and a woman.’”

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In the 19th century there were many individuals who could be considered larger than life, particularly in the United States.

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More Was Lost is a memoir of two parts; the first reads like a fairy tale and the second like a nightmare.”

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“a well-written, family memoir that tackles broad questions of identity . . .”

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Fans of Verdi's opera La Traviata and readers who enjoy biographies of courtesans won't want to miss this gem by Rene Weis, a regular contributor to the Royal Opera House programs.

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Enough books appear on individual race-hatred-based lynching in the South to constitute a genre.

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On September 18, 1931, the Regensburger Echo ran a front-page article, “Suicide in Hitler's Apartment.” The body of Geli Raubal, Hitler's niece, was found with a single gunshot wound to th

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Prior to David A. Bell’s new work, detailed investigations of the “life and times of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769–1821)” did not evoke notions of a short, slim volume.

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The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel: A Story of Marriage and Money in the Early Republic by Margaret A.

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