Nicholas Delbanco

Nicholas Delbanco is the Robert Frost Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Michigan. The author of 30 books of fiction and nonfiction, his most recent collection is Curiouser and Curiouser: Essays.

Book Reviews by Nicholas Delbanco

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“We’re in the presence of an author both wholly assured and tentative, both nagged by the complexities of narrative and able to exploit them.”

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Hilary Mantel is best known in America as the author of the historical trilogy, Wolf Hall, Bring up the Bodies, and The Mirror & The Light.

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Jennifer Egan is the prodigiously talented author of seven works of fiction, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning A Visit from the Goon Squad (2011).

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Joris-Karl Huysmans (1848–1907) was a card-carrying member of the artistic community in turn-of-the-20th century Paris.

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“This book is both witty and fierce. It’s a gift that keeps on giving, and we can only hope its nonagenarian author continues to do so as well.”

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Allan Gurganus planted his flag on the literary landscape in 1989 with The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All.

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That Jonathan Franzen has large ambitions as an author is not news. Nor is it news that his success has been large.

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The human animal loves puzzles, and it’s all the more enticing if it’s a puzzle that others can’t solve.

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The question of literature composed in a second language is a vexed and interesting one.

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A venture titled Bookmarked has been launched by Ig Publishing. The theory and practice of the series is that a writer considers some other writer’s book that influenced her or him greatly.

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“Barnes is a delightful raconteur, and there’s a good deal of first-person rumination here throughout.

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“an astonishing book.”

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“Line after line and scene after scene delight the reader with its account of a world gone by but well worth the returning to, if only as a tourist.

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Paul Gauguin (1838–1903) is a compelling figure, both as an artist and man.

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“David Szalay’s art accomplishes what arithmetic can’t: The whole adds up to more than its individual components, and in sum his Turbulence is a tour de force.”

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If offers compelling research, information, and speculative insight. It reminds us all that we should read Kipling again.”

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We know more about William Shakespeare than we know about the lives and work of most of his contemporaries; the documentary record, though sparse, is substantial.

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“This is a collection to savor in bits and bite-sized portions; there are too many pungencies to swallow in one gulp.”

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“There’s a lilting music to this writer’s sentences, a love of language throughout.”

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“To spend hours in this writer’s company as he records the days and years is to have an instructive and unfailingly urbane companion.”

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“the writing soars. Stoner redux is a dream come true for those who dream of immortality; the afterlife of the novel beggars its beginning.”

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". . . a marvel-filled book."

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Richard Elman (1934–1997) was a major figure in literary circles of the latter part of the last century, a consequential presence in our culture’s “scene.” Known primarily as a novelist—for such no