World War II

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“Although the subtitle of the book credits Churchill with the fight to save civilization, in the end Dugard makes clear that is was the courageous pilots of the RAF . . .”

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“presents D-Day history not as some sweeping battle narrative, but as the thousands of individuals stories that collectively decided the course of the battle that day.”

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During World War II, more than 600 United States planes were lost ferrying supplies between India and China.

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By the end of World War II, the U.S. Navy was the foremost maritime power, eclipsing Britain’s Royal Navy. However, at the end of 1942, the U.S.

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“Nelson keeps the prose lively with intimate storytelling . . .”

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All these case studies are extremely well-written and offer a variety of unique and common lessons learned for future study.”

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In this short book filled with drawings and photographs, Edward Ward tells a concise technical service history of the Spitfire, what he describes as the “most important British aircraft of all time

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With the media focused on the bombing of civilians in Ukraine and Gaza, revisiting the use of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and its impact on the civilian population, seems timely.

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The book is replete with maps, photographs, profiles of commanders and weapons, and illustrations that help explain the brutal combat in a region that another historian ha

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“In Nazis on the Potomac, Sutton tells the incredible previously secret story of an institution where Americans listened and learned the lessons needed to win World War II.”

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“Uniting Against the Reich is Truxal’s first book, and it is based on solid research, sound if debatable judgments, and a refreshing lack of moralistic tone.”

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The Race for the Atom Bomb is less the story of how the Soviet Union stole the secrets of the Manhattan Project as it is a defense of J.

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One wonders what author Jonathan Raban is trying to tell us in his memoir, Father and Son.

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“Dannatt and Lyman tell an engaging history of the British army, 1918 to 1940, that offers lessons in ‘the failure of both political and military leadership and disfunctionality between the

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“All of these women . . . served their country with patriotism and a sense of duty no less than any man who went off to war.”

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“McManus provides an infantryman’s view of warfare at its dirtiest and bleakest.”

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“A nuanced, absorbing, and perhaps definitive story of the last weeks of World War II.”

Japan was unwilling to surrender.

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“provides a wonderful balance of narrative history with personal recollections, examining both sides . . .

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"This isn't an objective interpretation after all, but one bent on proving Ukrainian innocence, even to the extent of defending Nazis as simply fodder for a sensation-seeking media mill."

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“The lessons to be learned from Hitler’s rise to power are legion. Among them are the notion that . . . sociopaths ultimately are self-interested and . . . loyalty is a one-way street.

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The campaign in the Mediterranean is often considered the forgotten campaign of the European Theater of World War II, generally receiving much less coverage from historians than Northwest Europe, p

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“Murphy is plain-spoken, a man of faith and modesty, and the ideal person to write this World War II memoir. One hopes the television series will be half as good.”

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“Were it not for the horrors visited on Germany’s European neighbors, as well as on many of its own citizens, by the Nazis, one might almost feel a twinge of sympathy for the common German.

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