Marissa Moss

Marissa Moss has written more than 60 children's books, from picture books to middle-grade and young adult novels. Best known for the Amelia’s Notebook series, her books are popular with teachers and children alike. Both Rachel's Journal and Hannah’s Journal are included in state textbooks. Her picture book biographies of historical figures from Jackie Mitchell to Maggie Gee to Kate Warne have won many awards.

Barbed Wire Baseball, a recent nonfiction picture book, won the California Book Award, and was named an ALA Notable Book as well as a Notable Book for Social Studies.

Last spring, her first adult book was published. Last Things, a Memoir of Love and Loss, uses her trademark mix of art and text in a graphic memoir about her husband's death from ALS.

Book Reviews by Marissa Moss

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“A riveting story of a horrible injustice enacted with careful, logical cruelty in the name of national security.

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“In this wide-ranging story of exploration, Fetter-Vorm captures both the mystical pull of the moon and the many men and women who worked hard to understand and reach it. . . .

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“Each of the lives portrayed here exemplify the importance of perseverance and a refusal to be constrained by social boundaries.”

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“a slapdash simplification of history to a cartoonish extreme.

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“A standout among the board book crowd.”

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“This book offers a sweet ray of hope in a very confusing time.”

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“A lively mix of words and pictures . . .”

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“Fun and engaging, Untitled proves just how interactive a deceptively simple picture book can be.”

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“[C]heerful, funny . . . Perfect balance of text to art . . .”

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“An intriguing story asking the eternal question, What is Art? . . .

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“The question of ‘What are you?’ has never been answered with so much charm.”

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“Clear descriptions and beautiful illustrations . . .”

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“Masterly, vivid, dramatic. . . This is beautiful writing, visceral and deep.”

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It seems too bizarre to be true, even in the dreamworld of surrealism.

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“Budding inventors, doodlers, and cartoonists will find much to love in this fun, inspiring book.”

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“Who is this picture book for? Any child would find it a horror story about a destructive father and a mother who can't keep herself or her son safe.

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“a good job of explaining the mechanics of bridge building”

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“Does an excellent job of describing Debs’ life and work, his passion and purpose.”

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The press release for this book reads “Tyson covers all the major concepts in astrophysics, and does so in an accessible but never condescending style.” It is indeed true that the major concepts ar

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“a quick, mesmerizing read.”

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"Mary Walker deserves better than this. And so do young readers."

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“Stunning photographs . . . fascinating information . . .”

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“A masterful combination of words and pictures, Harold Loves His Woolly Hat is about love and the different forms it can take, if only you open your eyes to it and are willing to s

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“Struttin' with Some Barbecue provides an important introduction to a musical figure most people won't have heard of, along with the story of her better-known part

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In the third picture book by this talented team, I Am Human teaches both compassion and mindfulness, popular trends in children's books these days.

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“Bald Knobber is a good example of how design matters in books, how we experience a book as an object first, then dive into the pages to discover the world inside.

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The young boy who narrates Sing to the Moon has big dreams but when a rainy day keeps him from his exotic plans, he discovers a different kind of indoor adventure invented b

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John Hendrix tells a very complicated story in tracing Dietrich Bonhoeffer's journey of faith in Nazi Germany. The graphic format serves him well as he intersperses dense text passages with art.

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Passing for Human is a compelling weaving of stories about author-illustrator Liana Finck's mother, her father, herself and how each of them has difficulties figuring out themselves, figur

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“With the comics and the cleverly designed art, this book has something for everybody. And those with a keener curiosity will find plenty to satisfy their elemental interest.”

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The Dreamer, a spare picture book written and illustrated by Il Sung Na, is clearly meant to inspire young readers to try for the impossible.

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The theme of parents' love for their child is a recurring one in children's books, from Love You Forever by Robert Munsch to Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney to Mama

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This is the time of stories about refugees and immigrants in every format possible.

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Jules Feiffer is a masterful storyteller, creating unforgettable characters like his dancers, his neurotics, his therapists.

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Learning a new language can be daunting, but Chineasy for Children makes it fun, if not exactly easy.

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“for kids worried about the first day of school, this book offers something to make them feel better.”

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Michael Kupperman is a graphic novelist with a cult following (Snake 'n' Bacon's Cartoon Cabaret, Tales Designed to Thrizzle).

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Vietnamese Memories by Clement Baloup starts as a series of memories of the Vietnam War, different men, now living in France, telling how they left Saigon at the end of the war.

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Since their first book together, Extra Yarn (2012, Balzer & Bray), Barnett and Klassen have created a series of deceptively simple, clever books.

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Alpha: Abidjan to Paris tells the story of the refugees’ struggle from up close and personal through the character of Alpha, a cabinet maker in the Cote d'Ivore, the Ivory Coast.

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There is a lot of discussion these days in the children's book world about books providing mirrors and windows, ways for readers to recognize themselves and see other cultures.

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Narwhal and Jellyfish are the stars of this easy reader series by Ben Clanton.

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It is a difficult task to dive into the sequel to a book that received universal praise and many starred reviews without having read that first acclaimed book.

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Black Bird Yellow Sun operates on several levels, more complicated than you might think a simple board book would be.

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The theme of desperately wanting a pet is not new to children's books, but it takes a different form in I Love Cats!, the follow-up to Stainton and Staake's I Love Dogs!. What is

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We may think that nostalgia is something only adults feel, looking back on their childhoods, but children feel nostalgic, too.

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STEM books are hot topics now and every parent wants their child to be a mathematical whiz, if not a genius.