Nonfiction

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out to offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by tradition

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We should all know who Michael J. Fox is. He was the smart, financially driven whiz kid in the TV show “Family Ties.” He played Marty McFly in Back to the Future.

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The relationship between fashion and minimalism has been discussed, examined, and dissected for decades and even as recently as the New York Collections for Spring 2011, but never has it been writt

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The cover of Mike Vaccaro’s The First Fall Classic is a sepia-toned photograph of 1912 World Series combatants “Smokey” Joe Wood of the Boston Red Sox and Jeff Tesreau of the New York Gian

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So what happens to helicopter parents and their children when the kids go to college? Well, that’s precisely the question Barbara K.

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It would be easy to write an Obama-backlash book using buzzwords and cliché ridden accounts of the right-wing talk show blather-babblers.

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Complexion Perfection offers a fair amount of useful information for people who are interested in making their skin look better.

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Do you believe that every child has the potential to be a strong reader? Author and Texas sixth-grade teacher, Donalyn Miller, does.

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Rather than a biography, this volume is about Walter Albini, the seer, the prescient man who foresaw the future of fashion way before his untimely demise.

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(Oxford University Press, 2010)

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“The bishop was much struck by some of the analogies I drew.” —Oscar Wilde

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This isn’t a great book. That’s not to say it’s useless. It has value, like a recipe for mashed potatoes or buttermilk pancakes.

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As the debate rolls on about Immigration Reform in the United States, as Congress considers President Obama’s vision to design a “Path to Citizenship,” and as Arizona tightens req

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Author Rush, a college playwrighting teacher and the author of several produced plays, has created a masterful textbook for playwrights. He gives the basics of the craft in clear, simple language.

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Jose M. De Olivares has over 40 years of experience helping teens. De Olivares survived growing up on the streets in the South Bronx, walked the beat in the housing projects of St.

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Why read a book with a title that would scare the sanest person among us? Is it to prove one is “highbrow” or an “intellectual” or just looking to fool those around him?

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For years, Hollywood has been selling the story in which a regular guy gets threatened by the minions of an evil government, only to win out against all odds in the end.

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by traditional

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By any standards, Brian Fagan is a leading authority on archaeology, and, with 46 books on the subject to his credit, he is among the world’s leading popularizers of the field.

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Have you ever picked up a book really expecting to totally love it? Then have you ever been just slightly less enthusiastic when you finished it?

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This is a book that aims to set the West’s exploration of the solar system in its historical context.

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Susan Moon’s use of the old cliché “This is getting old” is not meant as a complaint, but rather as a shared exploration of that state in which we are all passing through.

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Americans viewing those old and trite film shots of people lounging around languidly in opium dens, powerless to escape from their drugged reveries, used to feel scorn for those addicts.

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