Personal Growth

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“a book that is erudite, practical, reader-friendly, deeply personal, and sure to help even the most anxious among us.”

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“Hill’s account of low vision is a thought-provoking and emotionally powerful contribution to understanding vision loss.

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“‘Achieving lasting personality change means shaking things up, unlearning some of your many habits and routines that contribute to the kind of person you are, and overwriting them with new

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Trauma doesn’t develop only from violent incidents. It can manifest through institutional racism, the stress of cultural bias, or the isolation of pandemic.

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“a pocket-sized paper embrace that will encourage all readers to find hope when life upends our schemes.”

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Atlantic staff writer Olga Khazan tries to do much too much in her well-written, often absorbing work of memoir and reportage, Weird: The Power of Being an Outsider in an Insider World

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“Cecilia Aragon is no less than a thrilling inspiration to anyone who wants to accomplish something that frightens them or who has been discouraged from trying.”

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Are you stuck at home dreaming of creating a new life for yourself?

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Amidst the current global pandemic, fear has become a persistent and familiar companion to much of the human population.

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$9 Therapy is a delightful book, sure to bring a smile to those who read it.”

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“would make a lovely gift for a friend who is interested in learning more about personal change, who is exploring recovery from physical or mental illness, or who enjoyed and wants to learn

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Dawn Newton’s memoir starts with a cancer diagnosis. Yet Newton writes about change and loss, insecurity and self-doubt. She writes delicately about human value and how to know it.

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“The reader will leave this charming book with the sound of Babe’s raucous laughter in mind . . . Babe Giese was a character, and one anyone should be pleased to get to know.”

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“Darwin worked only ‘a couple of hours a day and spent a lot of time taking long walks.’ Just imagine yourself doing the same. ‘How fun would that be?’”

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“Another book by a productivity guru that aims to help us cope better with daily distractions. The verdict is mixed.”

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“We’ve been given an incredible gift as sentient beings: by changing the inner attitudes of our minds, we have the power to change the outer aspects of our lives.

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Rediscover the joy of daydreaming and awaken your creative self through Manoush Zomorodi’s guide to unleash from digital demons.

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This book presents itself as the “coming out” of Bennett and her Feminist Fight Club, a girl gang that banded together in 2009 to develop strategies for dealing with “sneaky micro-aggressions and o

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Countless people who are living lives compromised by disabling habits like abuse of alcohol and drugs, overeating and poor nutrition, smoking, and inactivity, have James O.

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Get Gorgeous proposes a mighty tall order—especially if the reader ascribes to the possibility of actually accomplishing this near impossible feat.

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An anecdote about the Bizarro poet and novelist Charles Bukowski opens the new book by (self appointed?) “star blogger” Mark Manson, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck: A Counterintuitive Appr

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In a world obsessed with productivity, it is timely to read a book that tells us who is likely to be productive and why. 

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Sports writers, at least the really good ones, have always seemed to be philosophers driven to make a living or pay back their college education loans.

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“The OPA! Way facilitates our discovering again, awakening, the psyche of our own personal and collective psychology amidst the business of today’s life.

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The Up Side of Down: Why Failing Well is the Key to Success reminds us that although it’s a tough pill to swallow, failure is a necessary evil in

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