Economics

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“Cracks in the Ivory Tower is a sometimes harsh, but honest indictment of the current state of higher education in the U.S.  It should be required reading for ever

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Everyone talks about it, but no one does anything about it.

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Dark commerce—smuggling, counterfeiting, pirating, fencing—is one of humanity’s oldest professions, noted and condemned by leaders of Mesopotamian empires, Egyptian scribes, and Greek philosophers.

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“Parag Khanna is right that the world is becoming more multipolar. China’s challenge to the Western world order is real. How the U.S.

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“Collier endorses capitalism for the long haul because it ‘has the potential to lift us all to unprecedented prosperity.’ However, he writes that ‘capitalist societies must be ethical as we

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“Capitalism in America is an unabashed, detailed defense of capitalism.”

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By all appearances, Beijing looks on track to become the world’s largest and most productive economy in a few years.

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“‘Who owns the engines of the economy, and how are they governed?’”

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"through this book of nonfiction snippets, however enlightening, the idea of the author seeing a much bigger picture emerges, one best told through the experience of the different parts."

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“A copy of Peter Phillips’ Giants: The Global Power Elite should be in everyone’s book case, like a good dictionary or atlas.” 

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Isabel Sawhill says she was “dumbfounded by the 2016 election.” Having already started her book she had to address new, fundamental questions. Who voted for President Trump and why?

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"One would think that a biography of an economist would make almost as dull a read as a book on economics.

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“From ancient Greece to the modern globalized economy, Kurz distills the essence of various schools of thought and the personalities who made them.”

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The concept of “the digital divide” originated in the 1990s and has over the years had multiple definitions.

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“a clever, deeply informative, and often brilliant analysis of key historical forces that have pushed U.S. politics and policy dangerously starboard . . .”

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Steven Brill’s Tailspin is an astonishingly shrewd and detailed account of our modern American reality.

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We tend to measure the success of a modern civilization by the products it produces and that its people use. Tangible things are easier to count than the quality of ideas.

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Ever since Donald Trump’s election to the presidency, the words “white working class” have had a hocus-pocus power in American politics.

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New York is a different city in 2017 than it was in 1975.

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In his 1964 classic, Suicide of the West, James Burnham expressed the global geopolitical contraction of the West by showing the unmistakable trend of the Western powers’ loss of control o

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Human civilization is constantly changing, argues David Smick in The Great Equalizer: How Main Street Capitalism Can Create an Economy for Everyone, a manifesto for a new set of policies d

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