Fashion & Jewelry

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Grace Kelly became Princess Grace in 1956. Marc Bohan began his position at Maison Christian Dior in 1960.

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Jonathan Daniel Pryce may be professionally categorized as a photographer but he is really a visual storyteller and a chronicler of style, not fashion but style.

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Fashion, including fine jewelry, has its own set of sound bytes, catch phrases, and talking points that highlight and speak to a specific time frame in fashion as well as being the au courant topic

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Coco Chanel was born in 1883 or thereabouts since she never really divulged her age, and she died in 1971.

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Paris: Fashion Flair is ostensibly about the talent and artistry of its author, Marc-Antoine Coulon, as well as about French fashion.

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Hunks and Heroes: Jim Moore: The GQ Years is a visual extravaganza of Jim Moore’s resume and his 40 years at Gentlemen’s Quarterly, as it was originally named.

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Ms. Rochas delivers a gift of fashion history . . .”

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This monograph has a bit of a disconnect between the chosen subjects. The main focus is on brooches with barely a thread of connection between them and badges.

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King of Fashion: The Autobiography of Paul Poiret is a book meant for those who are inclined toward fashion history.

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Almost any fashionphile or Anglophile will recognize the name Norman Hartnell, the designer who wardrobed the princesses and queens of the British Royal monarchy for almost one half century.

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It would be a lie to say that neither the brand name Carnet nor its designer Michelle Ong were familiar to this reviewer, but the name and brand that is familiar is Joel Rosenthal of JAR in Paris,

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Forty years and over eighty collections/shows are what make Yves Saint Laurent: The Complete Haute Couture Collections the quintessential last word in the oeuvre of this designer.

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As a rule, museum fashion exhibits have centered around a facet of fashion that is either tangible, immediately recognizable, or something definitively specific that really doesn’t require any sort

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What is quite extraordinary about Mary Quant is that it explores and examines the fashion tsunami she created in the ’60s.

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William Klein is responsible for lensing some of the most iconic, memorable, legendary and ubiquitous fashion images, so you might be expecting this glamorous coffee table volume that will chronicl

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The astute and prolific fashion reader or the Charles James aficionado will immediately wonder how Charles James: The Couture Secrets of Shape differs from Charles James: Portrait of a

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For as long as fashion has been recorded, there has always been one topic that is ever present and it is whether or not fashion is an art.

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“A book that should not be hidden but proudly displayed and offered to others.”

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If you are expecting some sort of Sex and the City compilation of stories featuring brands like Blahnik and Louboutin, well then, this is not a book for you.

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It is as if Alexandra Palmer has made the impossible possible; she delivers still one more tome that examines Christian Dior: both Maison Christian Dior and the designer Christian Dior.

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If you have a notion that everything that needed to be written about the late great Christian Dior and those who succeeded him has been already written, you would be absolutely incorrect in this as

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“This book is about Farah Khan’s Life Philosophy embracing the most important values of Love, Spirituality, Nature and Roots.

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If your taste in fine jewelry leans more on the traditional, meaning pieces with only “important” stones, of the Harry Winston variety, then Anna Hu: Symphony of Jewels may not be to your

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Not being intimately familiar with the work of Jan Welters, it was easy to have an open mind about what was waiting behind the cover.

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“Benaïm is the grandest of storytellers who pulls you into the subject’s life and makes you believe you, too, were actually eavesdropping on Yves Saint Laurent.”

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