Marc Schuster

Marc Schuster is the author of The Singular Exploits of Wonder Mom and Party Girl. A second edition is due from The Permanent Press in May 2011.

Book Reviews by Marc Schuster

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“Mr. Klosterman is as much a showman as anything else—and he never pretends otherwise.”

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“The Ecstasy of Influence is a book worth reading—it redraws the map of popular culture and, in so doing, pushes us beyond the confines of our comfortable minds, out into the larger world

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“Miraculously, however, there isn’t an ounce of self-pity in the book. Instead, Mr. Doughty proceeds with a healthy mix of objectivity and irony. . . .

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“All of the works collected in Kafkaesque prove both edifying and entertaining . . . A fine, intelligent, and exquisitely bizarre collection of fiction.”

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“. . . a coherent and compelling—not to mention inventive—page-turner. . . .

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“Equal parts fantasy and gritty realism, Promises to Keep is, above all, an artfully imagined clarion call to embrace the challenges of daily life, . . .”

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In Nazareth, North Dakota, debut novelist Tommy Zurhellen lovingly reimagines the New Testament as a series of interlocking tales set in the northernmost regions of the American heartland.

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Although Sarah Gardner Borden’s compelling debut, Games to Play After Dark, has drawn reasonable comparisons to Richard Yates’ Revolutionary Road, it might be more constructive to

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Kelly Simmons is a tease.

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If Jim Carroll’s The Basketball Diaries reads like an homage to Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, his posthumously published The Petting Zoo finds the author paying tribute to

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Although it bears all the trappings of a taut legal thriller, Dead Center, by Joanna Higgins is, at heart, a riveting existential meditation on living with uncertainty.

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Howard Owen’s The Reckoning examines the complex relationships between fathers and sons as well as the unerring tendency of the past to haunt the present.

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“Everybody lies,” insists protagonist Charlie Cahill at the outset of William C. Whitbeck’s To Account for Murder.

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The promotional materials that accompanied my review copy of James Franco’s debut fiction collection, Palo Alto, set the bar impossibly high for the 30-something actor-turned-writer.

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In X’ed Out, artist and writer Charles Burns returns to many of the themes and images that made his magnum opus, Black Hole, both a pleasure and a challenge to read.

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How to Read the Air finds Dinaw Mengestu building on many of the themes that made his debut novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, both a delight and a sorrow to read.