L. Ali Khan

L. Ali Khan's most recent book is Contemporary Ijtihad: Limits and Controversies. He is the author of several other books as well as numerous articles and essays on human rights, foreign policy, Islamic law, international law, jurisprudence, comparative constitutional law, the U.S. Constitution, commercial law, legal humor, and also creative writing for both legal and academic journals as well as the popular press In the U.S., the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent. Much of his academic writing is used as course materials in universities around the globe. He is emeritus Professor of Law at Washburn University and the Founder of Legal Scholar Academy.

Book Reviews by L. Ali Khan

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In the 2018 edition of Hezbollah, first published in 2007, Boston University professor Augustus Richard Norton adds new chapters on the complex dynamics of the Syrian war involving the Uni

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“General readers, with no initiation in law, will learn quite a bit about racial discrimination, civil rights laws, and how academics grapple with theoretical difficulties underlying race r

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In Making the Arab World, Professor Fawaz Gerges, a Christian Lebanese author, examines the clash between Arab nationalists and Arab Islamists.

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The American Civil War (1861–1865) falls between the two most hideous Supreme Court decisions related to race relations. In 1857, just before the Civil war started, Dred Scott v.

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Even the prose a poet writes is poetry; for sure, that is true about Henri Cole’s latest book, Orphic Paris. The book pretends to be prose, but it is poetry carved in paragraphs.

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Lawyers learn the art of writing persuasive briefs to win cases, even when their heart does not support the facts of the case or the governing law.

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When I signed up to review Brown: Poems, I had no intimation that Kevin Young, the author of the poems, had lived in Topeka, Kansas, attended the local public schools, and took poetry less

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In Speak Freely, Keith Whittington, a professor of politics at Princeton University, defends free speech at colleges and universities, bemoaning that ideological activists, from both left

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Amy Chua, a Yale law professor, has written a book on international affairs called Political Tribes, which investigates the convoluted dynamics of what she calls “political tribes.”

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Bryan Caplan has written an iconoclastic book, defying some of the deeply-embedded assumptions about education as a desirable social good.

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“Anatomy of a Genocide furnishes well-lit imagination, though shaded with sadness, beneficial for the communities trapped into mutual impairment in various parts o