Criminology

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“provides an interesting juxtaposition of continuities and change . . . of maritime piracy . . .”

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Many young teens turn rebellious as they grow up. They're trying to gain their own individuality to become independent, and many times they do this by bucking the system.

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“In The Trial of Lizzie Borden, Robertson displays her writing and researching skills in this piece of creative nonfiction that reads almost as a novel.

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What possesses a mother to kill her children? This is an age-old question to a scenario that unfortunately happens too often.

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There is a question that is rarely asked or addressed by any constituent of the American criminal justice system.

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President Donald Trump watches a lot of television. Tweets from Mr. Trump's account indicate that his viewing habits include a healthy dose of news programming.

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“a uniquely valuable addition to the scholarship on prison education.”

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“In the end, something just doesn't smell right about this industry.”

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Since 1989, more than 2,000 people have been acknowledged as innocent victims of wrongful conviction.

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Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst by neuroendocrinologist Dr. Robert M. Sapolsky is a really long book at 800 pages.

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“Alarming and timely, Justice Failed is a must-read for anyone hoping to better understand the reality of modern American criminal justice.”

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Blind Injustice provides great insight into how wrongful convictions happen in a system designed to avoid them.”

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When a juvenile commits a crime, the constituents of the criminal justice system must answer a question: Is the kid a criminal, or is the criminal a kid?

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“may be as close as most of us will ever come to understanding isolation, a sentence described by William Blake as ‘worse than death.’”

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“The book is a roadmap to where the ‘immoral’ crosses the line to the ‘illegal,’ a boundary not fixed, but a terrain of social struggle that shifts over time.”

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“provides a broad and comprehensive framework from which anyone can gain an understanding of the powerful forces that drive the criminal justice system.”

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"Prisoners," wrote Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, "retain the essence of human dignity. . . .

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Sociologists, criminologists, and other scholars regularly study and debate what works about the American criminal justice system and what doesn't.

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Don’t talk to police! What? Why not? Law professor James J. Duane tells you why; and if you do not heed his advice, you do so at your peril. Does that shock you?

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This book can be summed up in four words: It’s excellent. Read it.

If you need more details before opening the cover . . .