Biology & Life Sciences

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Imagine that sequoias and cedars, lilies and laurels, even daffodils and daisies, and indeed all the plants of our green world formed their own vast and diverse country, one that spanned the Earth,

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“As a welcome surprise, Seven and a Half Lessons is part self-help book on how to manage our own quirky brains and part manifesto on how to move forward to heal this country’s poli

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“From whale song to whalefall, Giggs’ science writing is deeply researched and as fascinating as the whales themselves . . .”

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The title echoes Virginia Woolf’s non-negotiable insistence that a woman writer needs a “room of one’s own,” and at the same time reflects one of the academic detours that Rita Colwell took when bl

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“The book’s underlying thesis is simple: The skin is a living, permeable ‘dynamic interface,’ ‘a complex, diverse ecosystem.’”

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The Vagina Bible is a reference that helps women and girls understand that the female body is complicated and fascinating and nothing to be ashamed of.

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“Bryson has produced a compelling, overly engaging work that is written for Everyman.

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Author Susan Hockfield, president emerita of MIT, and in The Age of Living Machines provides an entertaining popular science introduction to the convergence of biology and engineering tech

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“. . . a hilarious romp through chemistry and biology. . . . A fun way to learn the science of life.”

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“The open-minded reader will definitely find Darwin Devolves to be an enlightening and informative look at a very controversial issue.”

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“This is really a book about healthy ageing from the authors’ highly particular perspective—and it turns out that the fountain of youth is full of germs.”

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“Although When Death Becomes Life is about courage and innovation and dedication, it is foremost a book about hope.”

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There’s an old riddle that asks: What travels 12,000 miles but never goes anywhere? The answer: blood.

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“let’s also turn back to myth, reframing our scientific narrative within the history of the stories we tell ourselves about what we’re still trying to understand.”

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Pregnancy can be both an exhilarating and terrifying time in a person’s life, especially with the glut of conflicting information on the market.

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What It’s Like to Be a Dog is a well-written, enthusiastic account of a scientific study sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) to image dogs’ brains by Magnetic Resonance Imager

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“He takes the reader on a journey from single cells, to nervous systems, to self-conscious, self-directed minds. One can’t fault him for lack of vision or ambition.”

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A great mystery has bedeviled science ever since Darwin made a bonfire of the design argument: How, if not by the benevolent hand of the Almighty, did human beings become so resoundingly odd?

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Born and raised in India, Shoba Narayan left for college in the U.S. and stayed for the next 20 years.

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The Dark Mountain Project is a worldwide collective of writers, artists, activists co-founded by Dougald Hine and Paul Kingsnorth, dedicated to creating “uncivilized” art, poetry, prose, and more.

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Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst by neuroendocrinologist Dr. Robert M. Sapolsky is a really long book at 800 pages.

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“A wonderful, talented, slice of Africa, an Africa fast receding . . .”

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“Horse enthusiasts regularly experience the ways in which horses uplift and save us, giving meaning and peace . . .”

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