Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out to offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by tradition

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"There were times . . . when Kelly felt desperate, confused and shattered. But she also felt embraced and loved. And that sustained her.”

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I only recently learned that my father played second base when he was in Little League; I was, justifiably, cordoned off in left field.

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Academy Award-winner Angelina Jolie is one of the most intriguing actresses of this generation—an adoptive parent, UN ambassador, and partner to one of Hollywood’s biggest heartthrobs.

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?“More than anything else I wanted not to disappoint my father.” So speaks the heart of a young man, who uses that lifeline to struggle between two worlds: one, a world of a biracial family distinc

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Unlike the author of the latest biography about the physicist, Paul Dirac, I actually had dinner with Professor Dirac, and his wife, in 1975.

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“Maybe he realized . . . the utter aloneness of the fighter—despite the hangers-on, the crowds, the adulation, it was a pitiless profession.”

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“He is the beginning and the end of music in America.”
—Bing Crosby on Louis Armstrong

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According to his only child, Christopher, William F.

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For all the dyspepsia induced by the Great Recession, Niall Ferguson, one of our best economic historians, has offered us a tonic: a biography not of a dealer, trader, or hedger, but rather a b

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Those of us who grew up in the age of early television sometimes wonder whatever happened to this or that character.

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As words for this review materialize upon the screen, Mötley Crüe’s Greatest Hits’ crunches and screams in the background, raucous and direct in the commutation from auditory to written form.

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This spring has seen the publication of the 360th edition from The Library of America, in a sense completing, at least for now, the full circle of the history of American literature.

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In 1997, one bad decision environmental science writer and adventurer Jon Turk made during his 25 years of backcountry skiing triggered an avalanche that nearly did to him what kayaking and sailing

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This well-written book affords the reader an unobstructed view of the inner workings of the clumsy governmental machine named the FBI.

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“Cancel my subscription to the resurrection/
Send my credentials to the house of detention/
I got some friends inside.”
—The Doors (“When the Music’s Over”)

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Not too many autobiographies begin with the author sliding down the birth canal.

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The title of this riveting book comes from Robert Johnson’s blues song, “Hellhound on My Trail,” which is about being pursued by fate, by the law, and ultimately, death.

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We should all know who Michael J. Fox is. He was the smart, financially driven whiz kid in the TV show “Family Ties.” He played Marty McFly in Back to the Future.

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For the better part of this year, newspapers, magazines, the blogosphere, radio, TV, and bookstores have been filled with analyses of how President Obama squandered his initial popularity by pushin

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“Fenway Park, in Boston, is a little lyric bandbox of a ballpark,” begins the tale of Red Sox slugger Ted Williams’ final at bat on September 28, 1960, at the oldest major league baseball stadium c

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After all the pain of recession that we’ve been through, it’s a bit hard to remember that there was once a dot-com boom era in which high-tech startups found it amazingly easy to find financing, an

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