Nonfiction

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Diana Gabaldon writes in the beginning of her first graphic novel, The Exile, that her mother taught her to read by the age of three by reading her comic books.

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For the better part of this year, newspapers, magazines, the blogosphere, radio, TV, and bookstores have been filled with analyses of how President Obama squandered his initial popularity by pushin

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Ophelia Field was born in Australia to American parents and now lives in London with her partner and children.

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As a follow-up to his wildly successful Duct Tape Marketing, John Jantsch’s newest book, The Referral Engine, manages to build on his previous success with a book that is not only

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There was a time, up until the early 1980s, when someone of relatively modest means could, if interested, buy the great wines of Burgundy, the grand crus and premier crus, on a fairly regular basis

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Spider Silk: Evolution and 400 Million Years of Spinning, Waiting, Snagging, and Mating is an interesting, well-researched book about the history and development of spiders.

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The title of Millicent Borges Accardi’s poetry chapbook, Woman on a Shaky Bridge, does not come from any of the lines of the 16 poems in this collection but rather from its preface, which

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If a business owner is trying to figure out how to use the Internet for growing his or her business and obtaining more clients, Peggy McColl has the prescription in this book.

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The subtitle of this book is “A Glamorous Story of Power, Profits, and the Pursuit of the Perfect Shoe.”  A more accurate subtitle would have been the story of how Tamara Yeardye Mellon parlayed be

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“Better bring your own redemption when you come/
To the barricades of Heaven where I’m from . . .”
—Jackson Browne

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This begins as an excellent biography of a woman who might have remained unknown but for a miracle of medicine.

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Jossey-Bass has produced a wide variety of fine educational publications, and Teach Like a Champion is another quality resource for educators.

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 Ecklund sent surveys, each containing $15, to professors and researchers of the natural and social sciences at various elite higher-education institutions across the United States.

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You might think there aren’t any more good stories left to be told about the sixties.

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Emmanuel Carrère occasionally reaches Dostoyevskian heights of anguish in this memoir.

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The latest edition of the Legal Guide for the Visual Artist is more than just the fifth edition of the venerable tome; it is also the fifth edition of the book that author Tad Crawford fir

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In some ways, Jim Collins’ newest book, How the Mighty Fall . . .

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Crush It!, while not being a one-fits-all, is a book that covers the secret of how to turn your passion into a business. Vaynerchuck states that anyone can do this.

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Those of us who grew up in the age of early television sometimes wonder whatever happened to this or that character.

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Are geniuses born or made? Is there such a thing as natural talent? Are some people born with more talent and ability than others? For as long as most of us can recall, the premise of nature vs.

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This year’s Slap-In-The-Face-Get-A-Grip-Bub Award for business books goes to Jeffrey Pfeffer, business professor at Stanford and author of nine volumes on organization dynamics.

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(Oxford University Press, 2010)

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The United States is one of the most religious “first world” nations.

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Jose M. De Olivares has over 40 years of experience helping teens. De Olivares survived growing up on the streets in the South Bronx, walked the beat in the housing projects of St.

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by traditional

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