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“Anne Innis Dagg is a worthy subject for a picture book and this story may inspire readers to look for more information about her.”

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“With A Life of Service: The Story of Senator Tammy Duckworth, Soontornvat and Phumiruk have inspired young readers to ‘break barriers and defy expectations,’ to soar, to not waste

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The Secret Life of Butterflies is a gorgeous book with a blue cover loaded with Monarch butterflies.

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“Every science classroom would benefit from having a copy of Up Your Nose.

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“cursory and sloppy . . . ill-conceived”

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This book introduces a young child (ages 4–7) to Charles Dickens. It starts with his birth and childhood.

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As much a panda story as a panda program story, Bei Bei Goes Home tugs at the heart strings while informing the intellect.”

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“Together the author and illustrator have woven a powerful message, truly an anthem that children—and their parents—will want to sing loudly.”

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The tall and thin book, Nano: The Spectacular Science of the Very (Very) Small, draws us in with its warm cover of yellow, red, and teal.

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“Instead of focusing on the discrimination Beatrice faced, both words and pictures show the difficulties without focusing on them.

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The big colorful book of A History of Music for Children grabs your attention with its orange, oversized cover.

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Brayden Speaks Up: How One Boy Inspired the Nation by Brayden Harrington is a story of perseverance, hope and triumph—a firsthand account told in third person—through the voice of a boy wh

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“This book will certainly inspire many new questions.”

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“This is a picture book meant for adults . . .”

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The Secret Life of Whales is a huge blue book with a shimmery cover. It starts off by explaining that whales belong to the Cetacean family and are either Baleen whales or toothed whales.

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“The international flavor of this book actually makes the world feel like a wonderful place to be. These are real people, and they are shown here as happy to be alive.”

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Lobe Your Brain is a colorful book about how your brain works. Although it is laid out like a 32-page picture book, it’s really for older kids, ages five and up.

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Pop-Up Moon is gorgeously illustrated by Annabelle Buxton with stunning paper-engineering by Olivier Charbonnel.

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“A beautiful book with ingeniously engineered pop-up pages.”

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A stunning, trilingual love poem written to the U.S.A. is America My Love, America My Heart.

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“A model of how not to write history for young people.”

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Aah, chickens. What a weird and wacky world they are with their strutting, gobbling, pecking, crowing, molting, and roosting.

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“An important addition to the growing collection of picture book biographies of women you should know about but probably don’t.”

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“‘The whole country knew and still knows: through his lifetime of service to humanity, Thurgood Marshall earned himself the highest tribute.’”

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Little Audrey’s Daydream: The Life of Audrey Hepburn, would make a nice choice for a young person doing a biography on a famous or influential person.”

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