4-8

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Annie Londonderry had never ridden a bike. She was a mother of three and a hard-working salesperson for newspaper ads.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“It was a magical place. Building such a grand train station without computer-aided design plans . . . or modern equipment, was difficult.”

Reviewed by: 

Dan Gutman has written another title for his Wait! What? series, called The Beatles Couldn’t Read Music. A brother and sister, Turner and Paige, are the comic strip narrators.

Reviewed by: 

“a man who shared his creativity with the world and modeled how to live an authentic life in full view, placing importance on nurturing curiosity, and forever focusing on seeing the beauty

Reviewed by: 

Invisible Things is not your average picture book. Instead of 32 pages, there are 52. Instead of one main character, there are several, and not who you might think.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

“integrates frontier history, solid writing, and brilliant illustrations and mixes that together with imaginative fun, quirky problem-solving resourcefulness, big picture ambition and human

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

"Budding astronomers will savor each page and read this book over and over again."

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Even with its problems, the book is colorful, handy, and good for any budding gardener, scientist, botanist, or biologist.”

Reviewed by: 

No World Too Big is a colorful compendium of compelling stories about 24 brave young people who have each done something extraordinary to raise awareness of climate change

Reviewed by: 

The Library of Congress was started when Thomas Jefferson sold his entire library to the U.S. Government. He was a lifelong reader.

Reviewed by: 

“beautiful . . . contrasting images of stars and outer space.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The general message in LGBTQ+ Families is that all types of families exist, and they are formed in many different ways.”

Reviewed by: 

From the old-timey end papers (streets in New York) to the muted blue color of the book cover, the story of Madame Alexander: The Creator of the Iconic American Doll, is rooted in history.

Reviewed by: 

“Anne Innis Dagg is a worthy subject for a picture book and this story may inspire readers to look for more information about her.”

Reviewed by: 

“With A Life of Service: The Story of Senator Tammy Duckworth, Soontornvat and Phumiruk have inspired young readers to ‘break barriers and defy expectations,’ to soar, to not waste

Illustrator(s):
Other Contributors:
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

The Secret Life of Butterflies is a gorgeous book with a blue cover loaded with Monarch butterflies.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Every science classroom would benefit from having a copy of Up Your Nose.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“cursory and sloppy . . . ill-conceived”

Reviewed by: 

This book introduces a young child (ages 4–7) to Charles Dickens. It starts with his birth and childhood.

Reviewed by: 

As much a panda story as a panda program story, Bei Bei Goes Home tugs at the heart strings while informing the intellect.”

Reviewed by: 

“Together the author and illustrator have woven a powerful message, truly an anthem that children—and their parents—will want to sing loudly.”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

The tall and thin book, Nano: The Spectacular Science of the Very (Very) Small, draws us in with its warm cover of yellow, red, and teal.

Reviewed by: 

“Instead of focusing on the discrimination Beatrice faced, both words and pictures show the difficulties without focusing on them.

Pages