Football

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As is suggested in the subtitle of Giants Among Men, Jack Cavanaugh mounts an argument that the rise to prominence of the New York Football Giants between 1956 and 1963 produced two signif

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“an exceptionally good book. . . . Violated may be the honest portrayal of the seedy side of the college experience.”

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The current controversy over the name “Redskins” and the reputation of team owner Dan Snyder seem to be a natural legacy of the team founder and owner George Preston Marshall.

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Playing Through the Whistle captures the story of Aliquippa, a small city of just over 9,000 people in western Pennsylvania, not far from Pittsburgh.

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It is understandable that the public focuses on the exploits of our football heroes both in the professional and college ranks. These young athletes perform boundless feats on the fields of play.

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America’s favorite sport is football. Although some can remember when baseball was the national pastime, America’s sports consciousness has migrated to the gridiron.

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Hans Christian Andersen wrote a fable about weavers who promised their emperor a new suit of clothes.

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In 1967, Ralph Cindrich left Avella, a coal-mining town in Western Pennsylvania, traveling northeast on state route 50 to Pittsburgh to play linebacker for the Pitt Panthers.

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In 1969 eight talented African American athletes risked their athletic scholarships and likely their NFL careers by demanding an end to institutional racism at Syracuse University.

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“In Wild Cards, both the premise and the hero are irresistible.”

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Great achievements follow all that has come before and influence all that will come after.

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“One on One has a payoff on every page. Any sports fan will have a hard time putting this book down.

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“Its familiarity and comfort level are its greatest strengths. . . . [but] we can’t help wanting more.”