Art

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“Classy and scholarly, punchy and approachable, Jean Dubuffet and the City demonstrates what future research and curating could offer to the next generation of art history publicat

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"Beard avoids the temptation to lecture on what the author imagines as the meaning of the image.

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Published to coincide with the first major Berthe Morisot international exhibition in decades, if ever (this is, in fact, the first exhibition of its kind to be held in Canada), Berthe Morisot,

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John S. Dixon seems the perfect person to write The Christian Year in Painting as an art historian, professor, and the arts correspondent for a Catholic newspaper.

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Sargent: The Masterworks is a beautifully illustrated biographical narrative of the American Impressionist painter John Singer Sargent (1856–1925).

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A dream come true. This is what Frank Verlizzo, aka Fraver, has been living.

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Salvador Dali wasn’t the founder of Surrealism, the cultural movement that spread from Europe to the Americas in the 20thcentury. Andre Breton was the founding father.

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Edward Sullivan’s Making the Americans Modern is a highly academic study of art work during this particular 50-year period in history.

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Robotic Existentialism: The Art of Eric Joyner is a playful fantasy picture book that celebrates the “what if” of robots having free rein to live “human” lives.

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“thought provoking and interesting.”

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Our vision of the tumultuous history of Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries has become inseparable from the flourishing of Renaissance art, particularly the outpouring from such Italian masters a

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As one cannot truly categorize poet Clyde Sanborn (1948-1996), neither can one neatly classify this text about his life and writing.

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Many people have a hard time remembering what they ate for lunch, what they did yesterday or last weekend, or where they put their eyeglasses and keys.

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“No doubt, Georgia O’Keeffe would paint her support for the #MeToo movement though she might not post the tweets.”

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“Cézanne Portraits by John Elderfield is an exquisite book based on the exhibition . . .”

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Edgar Degas (1834–1917). Two words and a date range that make a pregnant, robust statement.

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Susie Hodge, with her depth and breadth of experience in art history, delivers an approachable panorama of an enigmatic category of art history referred to as Modern Art.

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“A bold and ambitious project, Jasper Johns: Pictures within Pictures, 1980–2015 serves as the most comprehensive collection to date of Johns’ mature work.”

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“this isn’t the usual tearjerker cancer story. It is a gleefully offensive cancer story. It is the Blazing Saddles of cancer stories.”

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“an insightful and ambitious book that is lavishly illustrated . . .”

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“as our fore-artists set the example, so shall we copy.”

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“Noma Bar is a master of the stylized silhouette and uses flat-color shapes to achieve highly sophisticated illustrative graphics.”

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The way we conceive of art traditionally, and how it is intrinsically linked to drawing, design, and painting, owes its popularization, if not its origin, to Vasa

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Spanning a course of over 300 years (1277–early 1600s) and encompassing a legacy of no fewer than 50 Popes (Pope Nicholas III–Clement VIII), Art of Renaissance Rome provides a narrow cross

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