Art History

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“be ready to be inspired by what dreams, doodles, desires, and destinations start to show up.”

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“Through a parallel exploration of their life and careers, presenting their work in direct juxtaposition, Manet/Degas reveals the commonalities and divergences among their artistic

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“In addition to recognizing the profound beauty of van Gogh’s work, Lloyd’s book fosters an appreciation for the artist’s authentic expression, and a sense of awe regarding the ferocity of

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“a snarky, slapstick, clever buddy comedy in printed form where each riffs off the other’s talents, making Hell a hell of a lot of fun.”

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Amber Creswell Bell is back with a project similar in design to her previous book Still Life (2021).

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“While the book does recount Picasso’s life, it is also a work of art history that provides fascinating insights about Picasso’s art and how it was shaped by his experiences as a ‘foreigner

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“Like the Dadaist project upon which its members originally drew, Black Mask proposed the complete ruination of bourgeois culture.”

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What could iconic names as varied as The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The Merry Adventures of Robinhood, Curious George, and The Inve

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“Intriguing variety, sharp storytelling, and spectacular images all combine to keep the pages of this emporium turning.”

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This book appears just as reports emerge that Russian forces have looted museums in five Ukrainian towns under their control.

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“Migrations, if placed on the coffee table, may supersede the phone during a commercial break.

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“This book is for art lovers, and lovers of beauty and truth who value the human spirit that will not be denied by the destructive forces that humans have created.

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The King’s Painter is an outstanding publication that requires and repays a very close and careful reading.”

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“Why do humans make images?” John-Paul Stonard might as well be asking why do humans breathe, eat, walk, or talk. Because we need to? Because we can? Because we do?

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“No detail escapes Dauber. . . . A master storyteller . . .”

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“From whimsical, wacky, pop culture, to the traditional classical artists, to those things-that-make-you-go-huh?

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“In these pages, ideas and creativity still matter, making this welcome book a cause for celebration.”

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Renaissance thinking was not just about making men smarter, more intellectual, and open minded (although who would complain about that happening!).

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“With detailed notations and interesting reflections on themes, symbolisms and iconography, this book is a pleasure from start to finish.”

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“For Millet and Modern Art, the essays are its heart and soul, down to earth and of course, modern.”

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“Line after line and scene after scene delight the reader with its account of a world gone by but well worth the returning to, if only as a tourist.

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“offers one of the most well-rounded, entertaining, and creative presentations of Gaugin biographies on the shelves.”

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The history of drawing wrapped up in a pleasant and readable text, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Drawing in the Golden Age is a fantastic discussion of the many purposes of the drawing

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Mostly known for his naturalist work with birds (the National Audubon Society is, after all, dedicated specifically to protecting birds and their habitats), John James Audubon (1785–1851) wandered

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