Annette Lapointe

Annette Lapointe is a fiction writer and academic living in Treaty 8 territory, on the traditional lands of the Beaver people. She has lived in rural Saskatchewan, Quebec City, St John’s, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, and South Korea, and now lives in Grande Prairie, in northern Alberta, Canada.

She earned the requisite PhD in English, with special areas in the history of gender and technology, contemporary literature, and science fiction.  She continues to explore these areas, and has a special love for Indigenous literature and both fiction and nonfiction engaging with topics of decolonization.

She was lucky enough to be given the option to work creatively, and has pursued that with enthusiastic fury. She has published two acclaimed novels, Stolen and Whitetail Shooting Gallery, and a short story collection, You Are Not Needed Now. Her poetry has been published in such venues as Other Voices magazine, Prism International, sub-TERRAIN magazine, and elsewhere.

In her copious free time, she edits The Waggle magazine online.

Book Reviews by Annette Lapointe

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Fully Automated Luxury Communism is an accessible, intelligent, and profoundly optimistic text with the potential to spark a revolution.”

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In Chuck Klosterman’s “Tell Don’t Show,” furious ad executives shriek out what might be the premise of Raised in Captivity as a whole: “the consumer will extract from the story we construc

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Poetic culture still grapples with the question, what is the proper subject for poetry?

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“In many ways, Gehrmann achieves what Upton Sinclair never quite did: She makes the characters real and complex, and she makes the political story a movingly human one.”

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Semicolon is a charming book. Cecelia Watson takes on “the most feared punctuation mark on earth” (cf.

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“The Grand Dark doesn’t rise above the pulpy, overwrought drama of the eponymous theater’s productions.

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Ma Jian’s China Dream is a dissident novel in all senses of the term. It’s a novel written by a dissident: “every novel [Ma has] written has been banned in the mainland.

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“Etter has created that rare beast: an effective, startling poetic novel. Its story is coherent and progressive; Cassie herself is intensely sympathetic.

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Orange World and Other Stories exposes the difficulties of wanting. . . . Characters long for things that have no name. They live on the edge of terror.

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Pride: Photographs After Stonewall is an historical monument in freshly bound trade paperback.

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Post-apocalyptic novels featuring orphaned teenage girl protagonists proliferate. They fill their own shelves in bookstores, and their adaptations feed film studios and crowd streaming services.

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“This isn’t a novel to reinforce easy faith.

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“The range of Rollins’ poetic skill is remarkable. The result is a collection of poetry which is magnificently crafted, readable, and crucially important.”

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Jean-Michel Basquiat was a cryptic figure in the 1980s art scene, and he remains enigmatic 30 years after his death from an accidental overdose in 1988.

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“a narrative that reminds its readers of the extent to which everyone who came after the LSD experiments, and the psychedelic sixties, is drawn to that story, but forever remains outside it

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“This is a book likely to age well. It’s genuine, charming, and confident in its presentation of independent girlhood.”

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“Too Fat to Go to the Moon mainly distinguishes itself by its lack of charm, insight, plot, humanity, or willingness to engage on any real intellectual level.

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Ruin’s Wake presents a future dystopia of totalitarian rule loosely modeled on modern North Korea: the power of the state (and the associated military) is absolute, technology works only i

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Caroline Knox’s poetry collection Hear Trains seems to arrive from another era. Its strong early poems are rural, sensory affairs.

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“If Jorge Luis Borges’ fables had deep human dimension, they would read like Chiang’s tales; Chiang’s writing deserves to be treated with equal respect and reverence.”

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“New terrors are what Kiernan offers, for worse, but for transformative worse.”

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“Doctorow would have been better served to render his ideas as essays, so that he could give them the complexity they deserve, and release his barely realized characters from their politica

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“Guestbook is best appreciated as a portable art installation. The book is enigmatic at every turn, but gorgeously realized.

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“Staged as they are, in moments of near-communication, the images seem always on the verge of sound, even when they were captured in Victorian silence.”

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“Hempel’s stripped-down prose carries enormous emotional weight. Her writing is devoid of all clichés.

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“Gingerbread is a phenomenal book, haunting and dark and ravenous.”

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“The Handsome Monk and Other Stories is engaging, charming, and often dark. It offers a rare and apparently honest view of modern Tibet . . .”

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Famous Men Who Never Lived uses a classic science fiction trope (alternate universes) to explore the urgent question of what it means to be a refugee.

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“Real discussions about race are complex, and so is good art. Savage Conversations breaks apart the myth of the Lincolns as white saviors.

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“Leung has enormous potential as a writer, but there’s a layer of complexity that separates her writing from the seas of deep emotion.”

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“Graham’s poems are dense with meter and immersed in sound. They are living things that only surrender their technical cleverness to the human voice.

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“a profoundly intelligent book. Wang addresses complex issues with scientific literacy and personal openness. Her book is valuable . . .”

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“Art of Feminism isn’t a book for art students, and it’s not a book for engaged feminists.

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“Come with Me is almost a phenomenal book.”

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“Evening in Paradise encompasses two continents, three countries, and a comfortable complexity in human relationships.

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“Maples’ skill as a poet pours through every page of this book. This is difficult material, but she illuminates it with carefully shaped lines and flowing prose-poems.

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“far-reaching, ambitious, and urgently queer. . . . it contains magnificent work worth diving into, even at the risk of drowning or being devoured.”

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“Either the world will burst through the pipes and walls, or weltschmerz will pull our beautifully-arranged bookcases down around our ears.

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“The result is an art book: an exploration of an artist’s work with an eye to comprehensive coverage.”

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“politics on the level of the librarian, the parent, and the teacher.

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“It’s rare to find a genre novel so satisfying in its commitment to political realism . . .”

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“Where the paintings lurk unfinished and revealing, Killing Commendatore is over-written and obtuse. Murakami has written far better books than this one.

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Zahhak: The Legend of the Serpent King straddles the line between book and art object.

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“Leroux isn’t writing about ‘Canada;’ she’s writing about Quebec, the odd country-within-a-country that maintains its own culture and history within the larger nation’s borders.” 

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A. E. Stallings’ reputation as a poet is already established. She has the distinction of being a McArthur Fellow (2011), that peculiar laurel that bestows “genius” on the recipient.

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Diane Williams’ work represents a genuine avant-garde in American short fiction.

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“Never saccharine, often wry, always charming, this book seduces its readers and infects them with the desire for whimsical dishes and intimate connection.”

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Jane Yolen has been writing science fiction and fantasy for young adults since the 1960s. Her work is generally acclaimed and widely read.

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“Deforge has created a little book that’s both funny and disturbing.”

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This is a golden age of independent comics. Artists develop singular approaches, cultivate followings online, and burst into the print scene with fully developed universes and styles.

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“Beyond the Sixth Extinction is a playful but dark vision of a possible future . . .”

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“The Grand Medieval Bestiary feels magical, valuable, and important.”

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“littered with genuinely brilliant poems. They could lure disenchanted rationalists back to poetry. They might ignite a new movement in a culture. They are wonderful.”

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Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman are often cited as “couple goals” for their 18-year relationship.

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Jane Austen’s books are cultural touchstones, but the details of her life are less public. Most of what we know is reconstructed from letters.

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“To Survive on This Shore radically widens the range of visible trans experiences.

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This account of the rise of punk in East Germany is openly the work of a devoted fan of that scene. Tim Mohr is upfront about his emotional investment in the topic.

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Nick Thorburn is best known as the lead singer of the indie-pop band The Unicorns, and his work carries with it that deliberately whimsical approach to art and creation.

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Ideally, a collection of short stories should have a unifying principle, a thought or purpose running through each one that makes the whole greater than the sum of its parts.

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“The Silence of the Girls is magnificent. It is a novel that lays open all the human experiences that the Iliad buries.”

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The Freeze-Frame Revolution is “hard” science fiction, a novel (or novella—the book is borderline in its length) devoted almost entirely to exploring a concept.

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“Chambers’ thoughtful, measured work is offers space opera the depth and complexity it so often lacks. Her work is profound, engaging, and beautifully written.”

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“a disgusting, disturbing, magnificent book.”