Nonfiction

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Cost to see the Beatles during their first North American tour in Vancouver, Canada on August 22, 1964: $3.50.

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In the enlightening and readable A Thousand Times More Fair, author Kenji Yoshino opens a window on Shakespearean dramaturgy and scholarship and lets in a breath of fresh air.

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The second thing that the reader finds surprising about Christina Haag’s memoir Come to the Edge is how well written it is.

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This book can be summed up in four words: It’s excellent. Read it.

If you need more details before opening the cover . . .

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What’s red, round, and dirty when it’s brand new? Would you believe . . . a major league baseball? You might think it’s white, right?

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“Yawp,” “mudluscious,” “lullly, lullay!” Modern poets broke all rules as they infused their work with everything new: invented words, imagism, concrete poetry, free verse, irony, oxymora held toget

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Albrechtsen and Solanke have compiled what should have been a gloriously illustrated volume on the 20th century history of scarves.

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While savoring the chow and swilling the wine at the latest of the many, many swank Manhattan literary soirees to which he is inevitably invited, all eyes are suddenly on the reader when he is aske

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Books should be an adventure. They should either tell stories that pull us in and keep us reading, or they should teach us unique and marvelous feats.

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Quick now: What exactly is civilization?

If you find yourself hard pressed to define it, though certain that somehow you know full well what it is, boy oh boy, is this the book for you!

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“I’m not a businessman—I’m a business, man” is the reoccurring theme of this book.

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If your main goal in life is to be a supervisor, the boss, or the Big Kahuna, you might want to rethink that career goal by reading You Can’t Fire Everyone: And Other Lessons from an Accidental

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What makes the mind of a business visionary—someone like Richard Branson or Steve Jobs—different from everyone else?

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There are some books that one needs to buy the new edition of every year. The Gambero Rosso Italian Wines series is one of those sets.

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When Professor X decides to enter into the great American dream of home ownership, he, in possession of a MFA, turns to part-time work as an adjunct professor at two community colleges to help make

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Mr. Walford affords the reader great insight with regard to one of the most highly influential fashion decades of the past century.

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From the photo on the cover—(taken by his father Joe with a 616 Kodak box camera) of young Davis hugging a teddy bear—to the strings of hilarious and touching stories, Donald Davis takes us on a jo

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The title poem in Jennifer Grotz’s second book, a poem placed before its three sections, opens with an epigraph from Samuel Daniel, “When your eyes have done their part/Thought must length it in th

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The Hippocratic oath, “I will enter only for the good of my patients”, challenges doctors to resist market pressures and social expectations.

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In 1970, a young boy rifled through a large trash container in Springfield, Missouri. He reached in his hand and pulled out a handmade album knit together with fabric and leather.

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If you or family members are contemplating a trip to Mexico you may want to rethink your plans.

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The title and cover suggest that this book is a nonfiction tale of foul play, science, and medicine.

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“What are you doing without your scarf?”

“Where are you coming from?” the Talib shouted. “Who is your mabram? Where is he? Show him to me.”

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In The Thank You Economy, Gary Vaynerchuk shows why he’s such a popular speaker and author in the business world and one of the top 100 people followed on Twitter.

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". . . affords the reader an opportunity to better know and understand their parents  . . ."

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