History

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This well-written book affords the reader an unobstructed view of the inner workings of the clumsy governmental machine named the FBI.

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Woe be unto the American marketplace. Its raw commodities are exhausted, its markets sullied; it is a land of bad deals, betrayed customers, and unscrupulous operators. . . .

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Ophelia Field was born in Australia to American parents and now lives in London with her partner and children.

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It is with regret that we have removed this review due to the many questions raised bout the veracity of the book.  

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Fatima Bhutto has a unique perspective. In fact, she is the only person in the world who could write this story—and thank goodness she is.

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Sara Rose begins her story For All the Tea in China, this way: “There was a time when maps of the world were redrawn in the name of plants, when two empires, Britain and China, went to war

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(Oxford University Press, 2010)

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Immediately after Fort Sumter surrendered, the author tells us of the tremendous enthusiasm for war in both the North and the South.

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out to offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by tradition

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This novel is a real-time, disturbing blitzkreig. It is also an important, exhausting, and challenging book about our army during today’s conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Here's the situation: Small groups of poor Muslims from a fractured and ill-governed country sail into international waters to attack ships flying under many flags, staffed by dozens of nationaliti

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“The darker the night the bolder the lion.” —Theodore Roosevelt

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With a little background from his Three Cups of Tea, Greg Mortenson continues his unbelievable saga of his quest to build schools in “the last best place.” He insists on working in areas o

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