World War I

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“a tale of bravery, courage, and sacrifice . . .”

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“These are the times that try men’s souls,” wrote Thomas Paine, and his pamphlet is as instructive today as it was in 1776.

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Many authors are currently interested in Adolf Hitler’s rise to power.

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There has always been a dash of romance when it comes to Royal Air Force of Great Britain.

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“the backstory of Lawrence of Arabia is now more complete . . .”

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Some of the generals of the Great War have entered into common currency. Almost everyone knows about the American General John J.

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“Well written, with an exceptional collection of personal narratives, this book provides a fascinating look at the last four months of World War I.”  

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“fully justifie[s] the remark of General Alan Brooke that Britain should ‘thank God . . . that occasionally such supermen exist on this earth.’”

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It is easy to make war and very hard to make peace. The experience of the Allies after the Great War shows that a flawed peace will only lead to more war.

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"John Harte, a former playwright and freelance writer . . . has written a very uneven book about Churchill and the First World War."

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In the first two decades of the 20th century in the United States, the national mood changed radically from one of heady optimism to dissolution.

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“demonstrate[s] the war’s sheer and utter waste of life and resources even as the old mainland Europe monarchical order brought about its own demise.”

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“a worthwhile read. It will most certainly fascinate Dos Passos and Hemingway aficionados, as well as the casual literary biography enthusiast.”

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“A dramatic read, this work expounds in detail on critically important parts of American history that tragically have gone forgotten and unlearned.”

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“succeeds admirably in reexamining the battle of Gallipoli . . .”

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“. . . a book that conflates the emotional reactions elicited by the imagery with the thoughtfulness of well-written history.”

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“A highly readable account of a war Europe completely misjudged in terms of bloodshed and cost . . .”

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“Fourteen of the twenty people involved in these experiential accounts of WWI were in their twenties when the war broke out.