Debut

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Plot points abound at the beginning of Hays’ Pesticide: rioters attack police in central Bern, resulting in a murder; police officer Giuliana Linder deals with accidental homicide while re

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Far from the marshland where her family grew up and that claimed her father’s life, Loni Mae Murrow has found a quiet niche where she creates intricate life-like drawings of birds for the Smithsoni

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This novel is an insightful tale of an unnamed young woman venturing into the field of medicine.

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readers are treated to a solid police procedural set in a town rarely represented in the mystery genre but well worthy of a close read.”

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“lyrical beauty of Manfredi’s prose . . . at its heart, The Empire of Dirt is a rich puzzle impossible to resist.”

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“This is a very funny, easy to read novel that has an edge thanks to its main character’s charade.”

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“It would not be surprising in the least, and very much welcome, if The Bruising of Qilwa were to eventually grow into a full-length novel.”

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It is 1945 and sisters Lillian and Eleanor Kaufman live in New York City. Lillian is older than Eleanor, her identical twin by seven minutes, and the two are as different as day and night.

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In January 1940, 16-year-old Lucie and her mother, Yvonne, leave Australia after their home is destroyed by a fire where Lucie's father has perished.

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Historical fiction that features real people can be problematic.

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Hawk Mountain, the debut novel by Connor Habib, is a story of deception and manipulation involving people who exist in isolation and struggle to control repressed desires that often find e

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Greenland is another fine contribution to a growing canon of Black queer fiction.”

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There are summer beach reads and then there are summer European beach reads.

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“It should be noted that Murphy constructed this story in the first person for the three major characters—a point of view that can be difficult to follow.

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Holding Her Breath is a generational story written in descriptive language with steady pacing. . . .

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“First published in Sweden in 2020, the novel is eerily prescient in its depiction of Russian duplicity and ruthlessness. It even has a nasty thing or two to say about Vladimir Putin . .

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A multilayered story with a narrative driven by fate and a passionate search for identity and survival in the face of meaningless trauma, Four Treasures of the Sky by Jenny Tinghui Zhang i

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“In The Town of Babylon, Alejandro Varela, whose educational background is in public health, combines a social scientist’s powers of observation and analysis with a master writer’s

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Calla Henkel’s debut novel has a lot to please readers who want a heavy party scene, a frothy narrative that pulses with a heavy metal beat.

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“. . . a keeper that could easily end up in someone's private special collection.”

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“succeeds, thanks to Seckin’s unrelentingly honest excavations and sharply beautiful language.”

The Teller of Secrets by Bisi Adjapon is a coming of age, character-based novel that follows Esi’s first-person recounting of her girlhood in newly independent Ghana in the 1960s.

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“The nuances of human behavior are on display, and we can all see something of ourselves and our own mistakes.”

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Klara Hveberg has written a stunning debut novel about unrequited love, longing, obsession, betrayal, and more.

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“From the first page, As the Wicked Watch, told in first person through the eyes of Jordan Manning, straps readers in and takes them on a breathless and bumpy ‘whodunit’ ride that

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