Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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In Young Mr. Obama: Chicago and the Making of a Black President, Edward McClelland explores the early years of Obama’s life in Chicago and how those years influenced his life.

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Disappointment comes in many wrappings.

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The striped ticking pillow that Nonna Lisowskaja carried around her waist as a child caught in the crossfire of World War II becomes an historical treasure revealed only after her death with the he

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Part biography, part multimedia art smorgasbord, John’s Secret Dreams: The Life of John Lennon is more than just a nonfiction picture book: It’s a work of art itself.

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This young adult memoir is a slice of the seventies, with unmistakably wild zebra-stripes, conservatively crushed velvet, and shag carpeting.

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Providence has its signature upon everything of value, tangible and intangible.

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"I have committed 100,000 crimes, and those crimes were just all style."

about the same: selling people a good time they desperately wanted.”

 

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Niccolò Capponi is a historian and direct descendent of Machiavelli.

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Max Planck, certainly one of the fathers of modern physics, and arguably the dean of theoretical physics in Germany at the turn of the 20th century, was a famously decent man whose association was

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“[Elliot was] a muscular populist liberal who wasn’t afraid to confront business institutions by punching them in the nose.

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Rick Hodes grew up on Long Island. There was nothing in his background to suggest that he would become a doctor who devoted his life to some of the sickest and poorest souls on our planet.

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 For more than 50 years William Shatner has lent his talent to a plethora of characters.

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Today’s wired generation may sing “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning” from the musical, Oklahoma, in the shower without ever having the family name Hammerstein cross their minds.

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It’s hard to believe that the gorgeous creature on the cover of this book is 69 years old.

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“Every writer is alone . . .”

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“What you read here is what dribbled out of the jelly I call my brain when I asked it for my life story. Nothing more, nothing less . .

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“The byproduct of suffering, if you’re lucky, is appreciation. . . .
My windfall has always been a sweet tooth, the gold watch that
deflected the bullet aimed straight at my heart.”

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Without a Word: How a Boy’s Unspoken Love Changed Everything, tells the story of the life of Hunter Kelly, a boy born with a fatal genetic disease called Krabbe Leukodystrophy.

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What makes Loose Girl moving is the sheer amount of tragic honesty Cohen puts on the pages.

Naked honesty is becoming—a rare and beautiful fashion, suited perfectly to the mind of a writer.

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by traditional

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Cockroaches will endure after the final mushroom cloud disappears; similarly, the financial industrial complex—the economists, traders, bankers, regulators, and journalists—will continue to try to

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Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt, April 2009

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