Politics & Politicians

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Uncounted . . . explores methods that take away the right to vote, while we sleep . . .

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“Fritzche’s focus in this erudite and interesting book is less on how and why Hitler gained power, and more on the mostly favorable response of the German people to the Third Reich.”

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“Preston provides a highly readable, highly detailed account of the historic meetings and often difficult and contentious negotiations between Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and their staffs

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Michael Klare’s newest book departs from many of his previous works on America’s oil wars and disastrous, often provocative militaristic policies.

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lucid and very depressing assessment of the current state of what some Canadians term, the Excited States of America.”

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“When you’re president, you can do anything.” This slogan, adapted by David Leonhardt (New York Times, February 3, 2020) from Trump’s claim about getting his way with women thanks to his T

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“If removing a president was easy, Congress would probably do it all the time, since that august body is populated by the representatives of a fickle, emotional, and befud

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“The author is a ‘never-Trumper’ who used to work for the Republican Party when he regarded it as genuinely conservative. He knows how the party works . . .”

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“Mann’s book is about the professional and personal relationship between Cheney and Powell—how it blossomed during the first Gulf War under Bush 41, strained but survived the 9

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Neal Katyal makes an unimpeachable case, concise but comprehensive, for impeachment.  The author of Impeach knows the law and how to practice it.

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“Granted that democracy is always a work in progress, if democracy again shines in the United States, its broad appeal can bolster demands for democracy in China.”

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“Though one can ultimately disagree with Simms’ revisionist arguments, he has made an impressive effort to challenge the conventional history of Hitler’s approach to the world and war in th

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“[Mann’s] book portrays Reagan as a skilled and sophisticated political thinker and leader.”

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“To the average American, the notion of using the courthouse simply as a negotiating tool or a bludgeon with which to batter one’s enemies, rather than as a place to facilitate justice, oug

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“In Me the People, Nadia Urbinati has produced an exceptional scholarly work on a highly relevant socio-political phenomenon.”

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“If people read An Impossible Dream: Reagan, Gorbachev, and a World Without the Bomb and gather its deeper lessons, perhaps the race to Armageddon can be slowed if not stopped and

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“This is a book rich in detail. Its tone is neutral. It doesn’t give the impression that the author wishes to see the CIA abolished, merely controlled.”

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“David Maraniss digs deep into his father’s 1952 blacklisting and emerges with a riveting account of what disloyalty charges did to families in the McCarthy era, a profound meditation on wh

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Valerie Jarrett of Chicago was described by the New York Times as “the ultimate Obama Insider.”

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[That] The Presidents makes a fast, engrossing read comes as no surprise . . . It works on so many levels including for a general audience.”

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“offers an excellent starting point for understanding how Putin intends to take on the world . . .”

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Dark commerce—smuggling, counterfeiting, pirating, fencing—is one of humanity’s oldest professions, noted and condemned by leaders of Mesopotamian empires, Egyptian scribes, and Greek philosophers.

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