Political & Social Science

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Meera Subramanian, in her book A River Runs Again, poses the problem of the state of India’s ecology and its decline since the 1950s and the Green Revolution.

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Race remains the predominant discourse of modern life.

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Africa Uprising is a book for political scientists by political scientists Adam Branch and Zachariah Mampilly.

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Yes, we are in the midst of an American oil boom, one that helps explain the precipitous decline in gasoline prices over the second half of 2014, as well as an only modest rebound so far in 2015.

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“The case Dr. Zayas makes for immigration reform is compelling . . .”

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Dreamland stands as a model of meticulous investigative reporting . . .”

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“Poignant sometimes to point of inducing tears, Be Safe, Love Mom is not easy reading.”

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“Kudos to Dr. Biglan for daring to write this book, and let’s hope for all of our sakes that policy makers adopt some of the principles.”

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The basic thesis of this book, which modestly sets out to present a “science in the making,” is that “scarcity is not just a physical constraint.

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“a clarion call for citizen action, offering a cornucopia of examples . . .”

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“Until we abandon needs-based approaches where food insecurity is regarded as an individual problem and ‘handouts’ are given to deserving ‘beneficiaries’ instead of to rights-holding reside

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Social Security Works! knocks . . . the mainstream belief that Social Security is going broke, to its knees.”

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“multiple voices use the power of story to tell their Class Lives as both noun and verb.”

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By exploring these myths, Kenan Malik provides an important primer to revaluate the key drivers in current responses to ISIS, Boko Haram, and violent extremists in North A

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“What Dubler has produced in his weeklong observance of activities is a rare combination of prison anthropology, deep journalism, history of religiosity in the United States, and a personal

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“. . . about the innate knack everyone has to reason about the minds of others. . . .

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“. . . informative and entertaining, filled with grisly anecdotes and case histories, religious, social, and medical interpretations . . .”

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“. . . an excellent read for technophiles as well as readers wishing to get a glimpse of the near future . . .”

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“Until one understands what incentives motive people, it is impossible to predict how new policies will actually work.”

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In the introduction to her book The XX Factor: How the Rise of Working Women Has Created a Far Less Equal World Alison Wolf states that “until now all women’s lives, whether rich or poor,

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“We—mainstream society—cannot afford to ignore their needs and potential contributions.”

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In her insightful and absorbing new book Catherin Steiner-Adair exposes how the Internet and technology are disintegrating family systems.

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