Political & Social Science

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The basic thesis of this book, which modestly sets out to present a “science in the making,” is that “scarcity is not just a physical constraint.

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“a clarion call for citizen action, offering a cornucopia of examples . . .”

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“Until we abandon needs-based approaches where food insecurity is regarded as an individual problem and ‘handouts’ are given to deserving ‘beneficiaries’ instead of to rights-holding reside

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Social Security Works! knocks . . . the mainstream belief that Social Security is going broke, to its knees.”

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“multiple voices use the power of story to tell their Class Lives as both noun and verb.”

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By exploring these myths, Kenan Malik provides an important primer to revaluate the key drivers in current responses to ISIS, Boko Haram, and violent extremists in North A

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“What Dubler has produced in his weeklong observance of activities is a rare combination of prison anthropology, deep journalism, history of religiosity in the United States, and a personal

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“. . . about the innate knack everyone has to reason about the minds of others. . . .

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“. . . informative and entertaining, filled with grisly anecdotes and case histories, religious, social, and medical interpretations . . .”

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“. . . an excellent read for technophiles as well as readers wishing to get a glimpse of the near future . . .”

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“Until one understands what incentives motive people, it is impossible to predict how new policies will actually work.”

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In the introduction to her book The XX Factor: How the Rise of Working Women Has Created a Far Less Equal World Alison Wolf states that “until now all women’s lives, whether rich or poor,

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“We—mainstream society—cannot afford to ignore their needs and potential contributions.”

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In her insightful and absorbing new book Catherin Steiner-Adair exposes how the Internet and technology are disintegrating family systems.

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Anne Katherine is a boundaries expert: what they are, what they do, why you need them, and how to set them.

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Reading Brainwashed: The Seductive Appeal of Mindless Neuroscience is a bit like reading one really long college research paper—which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

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“. . . a book written by economists for policy nerds . . .”

The strength in Brave New World of Healthcare Revisited is its brevity.

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This entertaining and well-structured book is an ethnography of the New Domesticity movement which the author sees as sweeping America.

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When Raymond Sokolov took on the daunting task of replacing the legendary food editor Craig Claiborne who retired from the New York Times in 1971, he was head of a four-person department t

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“Bravo, Dr. Farmer, for saying what most clinicians are loathe to admit.”

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