Political & Social Science

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This first of four volumes explores the replacement of chronological historiography with a more fluid, less rigid approach that investigates what is remembered from the Irish past.

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Some books are designed for a mass audience and these are frequently works of fiction. Most nonfiction books (as this work is) unfortunately, appeal to a smaller readership.

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It’s probably a good thing that when Louis Armstrong sang, “A kiss is just a kiss,” Sheril Kirshenbaum’s The Science of Kissing had not been published.

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On the heels of her first offering, Going Rogue, Sarah Palin follows with a series of essays offering her unvarnished and unapologetic opinions on Family, Faith and Flag, includin

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Fate, Time, and Language is a collection of monographs whose subject is a study of the validity of fatalism from the perspective of the use of logic practiced by philosophers.

Death and sex are literature’s subjects, not science’s. What we care most about is what these subjects mean to us—not what they, in fact, are.

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George W. Bush’s Decision Points is a memoir of his eight-year presidency.

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Six thousand entries on language, folklore, history, and myth enliven these 800-odd pages, edited by Seán McMahon from Derry and Kerry-born, Dublin-based Jo O’Donoghue with additional editing by Ma

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It is difficult to sort out how much of Gray Lady Down is personal or an objective assessment of the New York Times by William McGowan.

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India and China are justifiably two of the world’s emerging super powers whose prestige was most recently demonstrated both by President Obama’s state visit to India looking for opportunities to in

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In Blessed Are the Organized: Grassroots Democracy in America, Jeffrey Stout travels throughout America on a journey to find those involved in changing the world in which they live by gett

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All across America, business owners sleep the sleep of the troubled, nay, the guilty. They awake screaming, afflicted with a common nightmare.

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“Barack Obama is what comes at the end of that bridge 
in Selma.” 

—Congressman John Lewis


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Veteran author Bill Bryson delights in skewering the arrogant rich in England and the United States, particularly the folks who lived in the 19th and early 20th centuries in this quirky survey book

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 Communication has been described as being what a person hears, not what another  person says.

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This uniquely-titled book was written by Wes Moore, the Rhodes Scholar, U.S. Army paratrooper, and White House Fellow. He is the successful Wes Moore.

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Author Rus Bradburd loves the English language.

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Cowboy Conservatism is an illuminating history of modern conservatism in the state of Texas—a conservatism that spread throughout the United States, but that began with a bullet that took

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“Get your score card! Can’t tell the players without a score card!” The sounds of summer. In an election year, the sounds of the world politic.

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“For two years, Mom, Dad, and millions like them loved their country enough to change it.”

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Forest Gate is a novel revealing the true cost of stereotypes and cultural propaganda and how everyone is guilty of this new type of blaxploitation being used by politicians, media—especia

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Why read a book with a title that would scare the sanest person among us? Is it to prove one is “highbrow” or an “intellectual” or just looking to fool those around him?

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The press release for this military action thriller states that James Hannibal had to write the book on an “un-networked” laptop and then personally take the manuscript to Whiteman Air Force Base i

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