European

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“. . . a valuable study [but] Professor Sax misinterprets the value the majority of British people place on the Tower Raven myth . . .”

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“John Kelly conveys an impressive study of the firsthand accounts, the government reports, and the secondary scholarship within a well-paced, judicious presentation of what too often has be

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“Ms. Emling’s riveting new biography reveals in page-turning prose the life-balance struggles of a true genius.”

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“Robert Kanigel knits together a handsome pattern as he traces the inherent drama within the destinies on the page—and in recollection by themselves and others—of the Blasket Islanders.

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“City of Fortune: How Venice Ruled the Seas is a fantastically fast-paced historical narrative and a welcome read. Mr.

“The thesis set forth by Stephen Fritz in Ostkrieg is so simple and compelling that it merits consideration even by those who have studied the topic for years.”

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“In a history illustrating the importance of global ties for the Irish, its links to a European economy facing unprecedented challenges by its own unity serve as a cautionary tale: to be ca

“Mr. Clark has a reputation for both his deep knowledge of military history and his ability to make it accessible to a substantial reading audience.

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Robert Hughes’s latest tome, Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History, proves once again that this erudite man can take on a mammoth task such as chronicling the entire history of Ro

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“Ms.

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Europe in the year 1660 was an environment of interesting mixed historical contradictions.

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Coverage of women’s contributions to the struggle for Irish independence early last century harps on two names: Maud Gonne and the Countess Constance de Markievicz.

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(Oxford University Press, 2010)

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by traditional

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The Icarus Syndrome uses the Greek myth of Icarus to illustrate American foreign policy shortcomings following World War I, Vietnam, and Iraq.

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out to offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by tradition

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