Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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Few works of art (or artists) have those special sparks that give them staying power. Some flare brightly for a moment, but then are lost to the relentless march of time.

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This historically accurate book, a real gift to children, explains the effective and admirable life of Effa Manley, the first important female baseball clubowner.

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In his Holocaust memoir, My Three Lives, Phillip Markowicz bears witness to the countless innocent lives whose flames were extinguished for their “racial impurity,” as defined by Nazi laws

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When they literally were “just kids,” Patti Smith, poet and rock star, and Robert Mapplethorpe, photographer and sexual provocateur, showed signs of the artists they would eventually become.

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The rich may be different from you and me, but that doesn’t mean they are any more interesting.

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Stefan Klein has written such a beautiful book that the reader can easily remain unaware that the original language was German.

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This autobiography is subtitled “the extraordinary career of a luxury retailing pioneer,” but there is a question which arises, and that is: “If you are a builder of shopping centers” does that qua

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Army National Guard Captain Benjamin Tupper brings us this important collection of blogs and essays from his year-long tour in Afghanistan.

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There’s something delightfully intrusive about peering into the lives of literary heroes of the past, reading their private correspondence and conducting forensic examinations of their everyday liv

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 Little is done to untangle the lives of the young Romantic poets and their inner circles in Daisy Hay’s rambling, unfocused 364-page perambulation that reads more like a doctoral thesis (with almo

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This novel is a real-time, disturbing blitzkreig. It is also an important, exhausting, and challenging book about our army during today’s conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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The filmmaker and trash culture maven John Waters still has in his possession a junior-high-school yearbook in which one of his teachers wrote: “To someone who can, but doesn’t.” Recently arrived a

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Emmanuel Carrère occasionally reaches Dostoyevskian heights of anguish in this memoir.

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Wilbert Rideau, a black man unjustly sentenced to death when he was nineteen for having killed a white woman in a botched bank robbery in 1961, spent 44 years in Louisiana prisons, the most notorio

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“Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope.

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Consider these words, penned by a man who helped shape one of the most prosperous eras in American business history:

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John Paul Stevens: An Independent Life by Bill Barnhart and Gene Schlickman is a scholarly and well-researched book about one of the United States Supreme Court’s most memorable justices.

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For years, Hollywood has been selling the story in which a regular guy gets threatened by the minions of an evil government, only to win out against all odds in the end.

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This young adult memoir is a slice of the seventies, with unmistakably wild zebra-stripes, conservatively crushed velvet, and shag carpeting.

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Providence has its signature upon everything of value, tangible and intangible.

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"I have committed 100,000 crimes, and those crimes were just all style."

about the same: selling people a good time they desperately wanted.”

 

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Niccolò Capponi is a historian and direct descendent of Machiavelli.

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Max Planck, certainly one of the fathers of modern physics, and arguably the dean of theoretical physics in Germany at the turn of the 20th century, was a famously decent man whose association was

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