Self-Improvement/Self Help

Reviewed by: 

“The Enlightened Brain is beneficial for anyone who feels stuck in a forest of imbalance and wants to ‘cut a path to a better place,’ as Dr. Hanson says.

Reviewed by: 

“It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare;
it is because we do not dare that they are difficult.” —Seneca

 

Reviewed by: 

“Only after the batteries were exhausted, and I had called both the electric and water companies just to say hello did I get off the phone.

Reviewed by: 

“Alan Jacobs’ bright, broad paean to reading is a sort of secular prayer book. It instructs, exhorts, laments, reveres; it has great faith and—best of all—shows the Way.”

Reviewed by: 

Sandra Steingraber is an internationally known ecologist and environmental educator.

Reviewed by: 

Bluntly, boldly, this book urges Buddhists to adapt its “radical teachings on forgiveness, compassion, and kindness.” Readers of Noah Levine’s streetwise memoir Dharma Punx (2004) will fin

Reviewed by: 

A career spent working in what some might term “God’s Waiting Room” has helped psychiatrist Marc Agronin, Medical Director for Mental Health and Clinical Research at Miami Jewish Health Systems and

Reviewed by: 

A reader often selects a book because of an affinity for the author, word of mouth, or an interest in the subject—only to meander through the pages to discover that, for whatever reason, it was not

Reviewed by: 

For a lot of readers today, the word “memoir” has become a kind of code word for dysfunctional family history: a portrait of a victim-turned-artist who overcomes tragedy and abuse to become the sup

Reviewed by: 

What if there were a time-tested, safe, and effective treatment for a host of congenital and acute conditions, that would speed the healing process for wounds—something so obvious that, upon being

Reviewed by: 

Widow is a collection of 18 short stories, which, if you go by the title and you want to be pedantic, deal with “women who have lost their husbands by death and have not married again.” This litera

Reviewed by: 

There’s not much to this book. It’s primarily sizzle. And instead of steak, we get a hamburger—which is not a criticism. I personally like hamburger, and I like the material in this book.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

So what happens to helicopter parents and their children when the kids go to college? Well, that’s precisely the question Barbara K.

Reviewed by: 

The book jacket description of The Creative Life as a “passionate guide” might suggest the writing will be urgent or lustful or vehement.

Reviewed by: 

If there’s one thing that doesn’t quite compute, it’s reading about the nation’s dysfunctional economy while one of the greatest business resources of our time–the Internet–is changing the nature o

Reviewed by: 

Can Irish sexuality free itself from the criminal evidence, the violent expression, the caricatured reaction?

Reviewed by: 

The Lost Years by Kristina Wandzilak (daughter), and Constance Curry (mother), is the raw and touching story of a family that endures unimaginable hardships in an attempt to save their dau

Reviewed by: 

According to his only child, Christopher, William F.

Reviewed by: 

How to Master Your Muck by Kathi Burns hits everything on the checklist for a well-designed book. A “how-to” title? Check.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . the lonely were more likely to have died than the nonlonely.”

Reviewed by: 

You Already Know How to Be Great reaches beyond coaches to managers, human resource professionals, teachers, parents—anyone whose role requires them to give performance feedback or periodi

Reviewed by: 

Some books are works of fine literature. Others are insightful and educational works of nonfiction. Still others are just a hoot to read.

Pages