Political & Social Science

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“An astute, vigorous, and candid participant-observer who seeks to radicalize the conditions by which Arab men and women can find satisfying, secular, and sensible lives together.”

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Former Ambassador and U.S. Special Envoy on Afghanistan Peter Tomsen’s first book has much to commend it.

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“This ‘Net backlash’—not withstanding our current communications shift—is revving up to full gear.

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“This is the best book of the year. . . . If you read one work of nonfiction a year, make this the one.”

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“Before the Paparazzi is the Pulitzer Prize-nominated press photographer Arty Pomerantz’s love letter to the art of press photography during a different time, in a world that no lo

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“wonderful and intensively researched . . . a fascinating, thoroughly engaging exploration of India. . .

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“. . . one of the hardest books you will ever read because it is so devastating and harsh and truthful, . . .”

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“Yoani Sanchez is a remarkable woman.”

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In Brothers in Arms: The Story of Al Qa’ida and the Arab Jihadists Camille Tawil opens up the world of the jihadis in the years between the defeat of the Soviets in Afghanistan and Septemb

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A read through this rather gentle, inquisitive look at small-town weekly newspapers could be beneficial to your health. It may even lower your big city blood pressure.

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Writer Kevin Desinger found a great setup for his debut novel: A good citizen and wine steward, Jim Sandusky, is home one evening with his wife in a fine, quiet neighborhood when their peace is dis

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Following Tweak, Nic Sheff’s memoir about methamphetamine addiction, the sequel, We All Fall Down, chronicles the author’s continued struggle to stay sober.

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Peter Corning is outraged, and so should we all be. The United States has the largest income disparity in the industrialized world. Top executives have engaged in legalized looting.

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Bluntly, boldly, this book urges Buddhists to adapt its “radical teachings on forgiveness, compassion, and kindness.” Readers of Noah Levine’s streetwise memoir Dharma Punx (2004) will fin

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This book can be summed up in four words: It’s excellent. Read it.

If you need more details before opening the cover . . .

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Quick now: What exactly is civilization?

If you find yourself hard pressed to define it, though certain that somehow you know full well what it is, boy oh boy, is this the book for you!

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". . . affords the reader an opportunity to better know and understand their parents  . . ."

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“Greed is good: Philosophy will help you to enjoy it without guilt.” Such might be the motto of Why Businessmen Need Philosophy, a compilation of essays dedicated to the thought of Ayn Ran

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When this writer worked in Kosovo, attempts to interview people from the small community of Serbs that remained there after the European Union took over the city almost invariably failed.

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The pillars of commerce—trade and finance—now seem like lost relics in an archaeological dig.

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Author George Friedman takes a very personal look at the next ten years in his new book, The Next Decade. He is clear and blunt in what he sees as the United States becoming an empire at t

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Len Fisher is an author of popular science, and his How to Dunk a Doughnut was named Best Popular Science Book of the Year by the American Institute of Physics.

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Peggy Orenstein, noted journalist and bestselling author has spent two decades reporting on the issues of womanhood, girlhood, and female empowerment, and she makes a surprising confession on the f

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“This book answers the questions (of politics and religion) through two broad theses. 1.

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This first of four volumes explores the replacement of chronological historiography with a more fluid, less rigid approach that investigates what is remembered from the Irish past.

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