Cooking, Food, Wine & Spirits

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“Intimidating but hardly impossible, these recipes put an exclamation mark on Pie It Forward’s case for the demise of cupcakes.”

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“Fifty dollars for a book as hideously edited/translated as this one? What an insult to readers.

Gorgeous. Unwieldy. Riddled with errors.

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“Because the pizza dough recipe and technique are now widely available online, cooks will appreciate the more unusual toppings and sides that make My Pizza: The Easy No-Knead Way to Mak

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“The joy of Ms. Simmons’ book is in its passionate love of food, a love that transcended everything that got in its way, like a pole-vaulter leaping over the bar. . . .

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“. . . French Bistro is a book worth owning.

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“While not exactly an ‘Introduction to the Wines of Argentina’ book, The Vineyard at the End of the World is nonetheless a good starter book about the wines of Argentina, giving th

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“Once you start, it may be hard to stop. Even a first skim through the book will likely lead to many pages marked for further testing . . .

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“Although The Expert Cook in Enlightenment France covers a time period far removed from our own, the 18th century trend toward simple and more natural food reflects our own time in

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“In addition to interviewing olive growers, harvesters, and processors, Mr.

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“There are so many head-scratching errors in the quantities, oven temperatures, and cooking times that you have to wonder if the book was proofed or the recipes tested before it went to pri

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“The tale of the British in India holds keys to the universal story of colonization.

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“. . . experienced cooks and bakers will enjoy the thrill of working with recipes written like the ones our ancestors cooked from, demanding flexibility and ingenuity.”

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John Besh doesn’t mince words.

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“The book breaks down its recipes into comfortably useful chapters on antipasti, soup, sandwiches, salads, pasta, vegetables, seafood, meat, and desserts.

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“This is a book that strives to be inclusive but comes off as solidly elitist.”

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“RÔTIS is a book for armchair cooks that will send you into food reveries for hours and make you wish you had been born French. . . .

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“The push-pull of Ms. Bijan’s relationship with her parents during their grief as she came of age will feel familiar to many readers, but the details of Ms. Bijan’s life will not. . . .

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If you have years of articles and website postings about various Australian wine topics, how do you weave all those writings into one coherent book with a single narrative flow?

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“My copy of Wild Flavors is so dog-eared that the book looks like I’ve owned and used it for years. I haven’t—but I intend to.”

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“With the idea of writing a book for the ultimate cookie swap—one with perfect, cheflike confections—Tracey Zabar began hitting up mostly New York chefs and bakers for their best recipes.

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“. . . take a closer look. This book was written to be used. Tips on how to improve your technique, as well as highlights of interesting ingredients are sprinkled throughout.

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“Part memoir, part teaching manual, The Kitchen Counter Cooking School is as much a transformational book about Kathleen Flinn as it is about her students. . . .

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