Art History

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“The Grand Medieval Bestiary feels magical, valuable, and important.”

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“Even within its self-imposed limitations this book could have done much more justice to its allegedly dangerous subject matter.”

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As a reviewer and reader there are issues that need to be considered before one attempts to read When Études Become Form, chief among them would be that no fashionphile that was asked abou

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"Beard avoids the temptation to lecture on what the author imagines as the meaning of the image.

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John S. Dixon seems the perfect person to write The Christian Year in Painting as an art historian, professor, and the arts correspondent for a Catholic newspaper.

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Salvador Dali wasn’t the founder of Surrealism, the cultural movement that spread from Europe to the Americas in the 20thcentury. Andre Breton was the founding father.

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Edward Sullivan’s Making the Americans Modern is a highly academic study of art work during this particular 50-year period in history.

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“thought provoking and interesting.”

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Our vision of the tumultuous history of Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries has become inseparable from the flourishing of Renaissance art, particularly the outpouring from such Italian masters a

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Many people have a hard time remembering what they ate for lunch, what they did yesterday or last weekend, or where they put their eyeglasses and keys.

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“No doubt, Georgia O’Keeffe would paint her support for the #MeToo movement though she might not post the tweets.”

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Edgar Degas (1834–1917). Two words and a date range that make a pregnant, robust statement.

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Susie Hodge, with her depth and breadth of experience in art history, delivers an approachable panorama of an enigmatic category of art history referred to as Modern Art.

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“an insightful and ambitious book that is lavishly illustrated . . .”

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“as our fore-artists set the example, so shall we copy.”

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The way we conceive of art traditionally, and how it is intrinsically linked to drawing, design, and painting, owes its popularization, if not its origin, to Vasa

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Spanning a course of over 300 years (1277–early 1600s) and encompassing a legacy of no fewer than 50 Popes (Pope Nicholas III–Clement VIII), Art of Renaissance Rome provides a narrow cross

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Ink & Paint, The Women of Walt Disney’s Animation by Mindy Johnson corrects the misguided perception regarding women’s lack of contribution to the animation industry.

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“inviting and engaging . . . a well-presented lure into the potentially overwhelming world of art history.”

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“A corrective look at Leonardo’s first 27 professional years when he was snubbed, struggled, and departed Florence thwarted and penniless.”

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“a remarkable job of taming a wealth of loony and preposterous Dalian information into a fun, well presented, and entirely manageable package.”

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Vincent Van Gogh was one of those artists who brought the fullness of his unique character to his lifestyle, his relationships, and his artwork.

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Richard Bellamy was the 60s visionary who championed the new wave of American abstract expressionists and who had the first eye for pop-art, minimalism, and performance happenings in the fabled Gre

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Children learn to navigate technology early on these days and have the ability to access information online. Book learning is less common and encyclopedias are extinct.

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Vogue Like a Painting is a love letter to fashion, photography and Vogue itself.

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