Anjanette Delgado

Anjanette Delgado's most recent novel is The Clairvoyant of Calle Ocho. She has written and published short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry for The Kenyon Review, Pleiades, NPR, Vogue, The Hong Kong Review, and The Rumpus, among others. She is an Emmy-award winning writer and producer of news, dramatic and comedic television content for outlets that include HBO and NBC, and she is also a speaker, directing workshops on writing, production, digital and effective communication.

She was born in Puerto Rico and lives in Miami.

Book Reviews by Anjanette Delgado

Reviewed by: 

“[S]ome empowering concepts and more than a few compelling arguments should you decide to approach Don’t Read Poetry . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

There are books about art that are just about art, and there are books that, rather than ignore the mixed media elephant in the room, frame the art they feature in whatever social, geographic, poli

Reviewed by: 

“[Y]ou might think of this book as you would your very own vegetable-cooking school + toolbox + charismatic coach in one.”

Reviewed by: 

“through the lens of the women they depicted in their work, women as warriors, as workers, as prostitutes, as mothers, as lovers, ever present even in absence, every work shining a light on

Reviewed by: 

“Read Out East to remember what it was like: the sad, tragic, emotionally turbulent truth of first love. And then stay for the prose.

Reviewed by: 

Theodore Boone: The Accomplice by John Grisham has a lot going for it.

Reviewed by: 

Appropriately, given the current challenges faced by women of color, the last few years have seen a resurgence and a reclaiming of the contributions of non-white, non-binary feminist poets.

Reviewed by: 

The Digital Plenitude: The Decline of Elite Culture and the Rise of New Media by Jay David Bolter is a book about exactly that: the decline of one thing and the rise of another.

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

Here is the book so many have been waiting for. The book to make sense of so many others.

Reviewed by: 

“Beverly Cleary once said great fiction should be, above all things, a pleasure to read, and Westside is certainly that, and then some.”

Reviewed by: 

Every year, more than six million people visit the Louvre Museum in Paris to view Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa for an estimated average of 15 seconds.

Reviewed by: 

First published in 1931 and later in 1988, Castle Gripsholm is a short novel by German journalist, satirist, commentator, playwright, songwriter, poet, and novelist Kurt Tucholsky.

Reviewed by: 

“Walking: One Step at a Time may feel like the road until now seldom taken: a book that is part rumination, part walking coach and companion . . .

Reviewed by: 

“[A] thrilling, touching, beautiful book.”

Reviewed by: 

The stories in Ha Seong-Nan’s Flowers of Mold are an acquired taste. Fortunately, taste for them can be developed awfully fast.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“As literary genres go, poetry is among the most democratic and fluid, with sub-genres to accommodate the intentional breaking of rules, the joyous flouting of form, and the expression of a

Reviewed by: 

“Not only did this novel . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Renee Gladman’s Morelia is a novella about the sentence. Well, no. Not really.

Reviewed by: 

Once in a while, you read a book that, though clearly labeled “fiction,” tells a story that really happened.

Reviewed by: 

“what is most important about this, the last of Brabcová’s gifts, what makes it deserving of a place in the most minimalist of bookshelves, is its honest, overwhelming beauty, its celebrati

Reviewed by: 

“this is a book by a talented teller who tells his tales with love for his reader, cleverly but responsibly (never cheating literature), the beauty and imagery of the verse providing a thor

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Its exercise in deeper sight works like a certain clairvoyance, as you realize the dancing you heard before, was the sound of feet trying to run from oblivion, to save themselves by provin