Anjanette Delgado

Anjanette Delgado is a Puerto Rican writer and journalist. She is the author of The Heartbreak Pill (Simon and Schuster, 2008), 2009 winner of the Latino International Book Award, and of The Clairvoyant of Calle Ocho (Kensington Publishing & Penguin Random House, 2014), an Indiefab finalist for Best Multicultural Book.

Her fiction and nonfiction work has appeared in numerous anthologies, as well as in The New York Times, The Kenyon ReviewPleiadesVogue, NPR, NBC, The Rumpus. and HBO, among others. Her poetry has been published in Sliver of Stone, Pure Francis, and in The Hong Kong Review, where she also guest-edited recently. A Bread Loaf Conference alumni, she won an Emmy Award for her writing in 1994, served as a judge for the Flannery O'Connor Short Fiction Award in 2015, and was a Peter Taylor Fellow in Fiction in 2016.

She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Florida International University and lives in Miami, Florida. 

Book Reviews by Anjanette Delgado

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This is a book review of The Bad Side of Books: Selected Essays of D. H. Lawrence, edited and with an introduction by Geoff Dyer.

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Space Invaders is a novella, barely 66 pages, each one only seven-by-five inches, that effectively holds between its covers a story extending far beyond the physical space it might occupy

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One of the best things about Cutting Edge: New Stories of Mystery and Crime by Women Writers, edited by Joyce Carol Oates, is that it is so very Joyce Carol Oates, every story imbued with

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There is something so honest about Gather: A Dirty Apron Cookbook by David Robertson. It starts with the aesthetics. It’s a book that feels heavy, solid.

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The Best American Short Stories anthology has been published yearly and without interruption since 1915.

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Louise Bourgeois: An Intimate Portrait is an art book in the way an antique rococo picture frame might be art.

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Frankisstein by Jeanette Winterson is a novel that is also a metaphor.

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“You will end up in love with Olive because she is a ton of well-written fun. You’ll enjoy her musings and put-downs and her reflections.

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“For over 30 years, Sharon Olds has been writing poems about the unspeakable: bad love, great love, death, childbirth, child abuse, illness, oppression, rape, racism, violence, and sexism.”

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There is a gift that surprises in the poems of Fanny Howe’s latest book of poetry, Love and I, and that gift is trust.

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“these are heady themes, but Moffett handles them with a sure hand, managing the magic, directing its music.”

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“Smith is unarguably a talented writer with a great command of rhythm and rhyme, of imagery and simile and all things lyrical.”

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“there was courage and conviction in his decision to eschew the title of abstraction that so many of his peers pursued in favor of a lifelong commitment to the tradition of representational

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You pick it up. The cover reads I Will Destroy You: Poems, Nick Flynn. There is a forest nymph dancing with a bear. Cool, you think.

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Here now come The Guardians: keepers of our urban landscape’s heart and soul by way of the unique small retail business, the bespoke shop at the literal center of the world’s towns and cit

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“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

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“Long before immigration was a topic we debated daily, sometimes hourly, Edwidge Danticat wrote for, and about, immigrants.”

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The Ghost Clause by Howard Norman is a novel about intellectuals. Or rather, it’s a novel about marriage and American village life as seen through intellectual eyes.

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Raven is delightful, both the book of poems by John Smelcer and the character capable of playing any role in this poetic movie of all our lives that Smelcer has written.

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Maggie Brown & Others is a book of shorter-than-most stories that is finished off with a shorter-than-most novel, or novella.

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Lee Krasner: Living Colour is a book that offers everything needed to know and understand the work and important contributions of Krasner to abstract painting, but also most of wh

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The narrative world is rife with accounts of the relationship between gender, and the recognition and attribution (or not) of genius.

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“Paint[s] an engaging picture of an artistic master who, for a figurative painter, was as generous with precise detail, symbolism and personal motives, as he was with color, while never dis

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In Show Up for Salad: 100 More Recipes for Salads, Dressings, and All the Fixins You Don’t Have to Be Vegan to Love, Terry Hope Romero does a lot more than provide a few recipes for those

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“a gorgeously written novel about race, about class, about street life and gender and the ragged ways we have chosen to define them.”

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Anthony Bourdain Remembered is a crowdsourced eulogy of a book that will be published on May 27, just a few days before the anniversary of his death on June 8, 2018.

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“[S]ome empowering concepts and more than a few compelling arguments should you decide to approach Don’t Read Poetry . . .

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There are books about art that are just about art, and there are books that, rather than ignore the mixed media elephant in the room, frame the art they feature in whatever social, geographic, poli

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“through the lens of the women they depicted in their work, women as warriors, as workers, as prostitutes, as mothers, as lovers, ever present even in absence, every work shining a light on

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“[Y]ou might think of this book as you would your very own vegetable-cooking school + toolbox + charismatic coach in one.”

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Appropriately, given the current challenges faced by women of color, the last few years have seen a resurgence and a reclaiming of the contributions of non-white, non-binary feminist poets.

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“Read Out East to remember what it was like: the sad, tragic, emotionally turbulent truth of first love. And then stay for the prose.

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Theodore Boone: The Accomplice by John Grisham has a lot going for it.

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The Digital Plenitude: The Decline of Elite Culture and the Rise of New Media by Jay David Bolter is a book about exactly that: the decline of one thing and the rise of another.

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Every year, more than six million people visit the Louvre Museum in Paris to view Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa for an estimated average of 15 seconds.

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Here is the book so many have been waiting for. The book to make sense of so many others.

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First published in 1931 and later in 1988, Castle Gripsholm is a short novel by German journalist, satirist, commentator, playwright, songwriter, poet, and novelist Kurt Tucholsky.

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“Beverly Cleary once said great fiction should be, above all things, a pleasure to read, and Westside is certainly that, and then some.”

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“Walking: One Step at a Time may feel like the road until now seldom taken: a book that is part rumination, part walking coach and companion . . .

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“[A] thrilling, touching, beautiful book.”

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The stories in Ha Seong-Nan’s Flowers of Mold are an acquired taste. Fortunately, taste for them can be developed awfully fast.

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“As literary genres go, poetry is among the most democratic and fluid, with sub-genres to accommodate the intentional breaking of rules, the joyous flouting of form, and the expression of a

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“Not only did this novel . . .

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Renee Gladman’s Morelia is a novella about the sentence. Well, no. Not really.

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Once in a while, you read a book that, though clearly labeled “fiction,” tells a story that really happened.

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“what is most important about this, the last of Brabcová’s gifts, what makes it deserving of a place in the most minimalist of bookshelves, is its honest, overwhelming beauty, its celebrati

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“this is a book by a talented teller who tells his tales with love for his reader, cleverly but responsibly (never cheating literature), the beauty and imagery of the verse providing a thor

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“Its exercise in deeper sight works like a certain clairvoyance, as you realize the dancing you heard before, was the sound of feet trying to run from oblivion, to save themselves by provin