Science & Math

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When George Mallory was asked why he climbed Mount Everest he said, “Because it was there.” A similar kind of question was asked of Peter Diamandis, founder of the XPRIZE.

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Code Warriors is an informative, well balanced, and eye-opening history of the NSA.”

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Daniel Levitin wants us to eat our spinach, an unsavory chore for an increasingly innumerate society.

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If there were a genre classification “nonfiction thriller” then this riveting book would be its bestselling headliner.

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The Shock of the Anthropocene is a detailed, data-driven, and well-argued critique of conventional thought [about the ecosystem] . . .”

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“Rublack creates an astute and informative study of witchcraft and witch trials.”

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Many scholars dream of writing The Great Book on the determinism of the past. A challenge is to write it for a popular audience while retaining the excitement of narrative history.

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This fantastic book owes a great debt to Carl Sagan’s original Cosmos series and bestselling book.

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Readers interested in anthropology and the cultural exploration of why humans have created the idea of home and what this idea means will enjoy John S.

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In The Paradox of Evolution, physiologist Stephen Rothman claims to expose a major and neglected problem in Darwin’s theory of evolution, and it is a paradox: reproduction is purposeful, f

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“a challenging and informative look at the complex functioning of life processes.”

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XKCD comic artist Randall Munroe has created a book to explain how things work.

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Both Stuart Lowe and Chris North are astronomers, and together they have created a brilliant collection of infographics in order to make complex ideas graspable through visual representations.

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“Rather than theological bickering or ‘irrelevant moral imperatives,’ Wathey reminds us of our humanism and our hubris.”

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Matt Parker is a comedian and a mathematician, a nerd who revels in the challenge of numbers and believes math can be recreational, and he is the best person possible to write a book about math to

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Curvology purports to take us on “a scientific journey into the evolution of women’s bodies and what that means for their brains.” Engagingly, David Bainbridge attempts to diffuse the unea

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relevant and soul-searching . . .”

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This well-researched book provides a fascinating glimpse into the biography of a pioneering author. It also sheds light on the origins of psychedelic America in the 60s and beyond.

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Kepler and the Universe by David Love is an interesting, informative, and exciting book—especially if the reader has an interest in science or wants to know more about the famed scientific

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One of the hallmarks of modern communication is the glossy, well-illustrated general science based histories of the origins of our species.

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“thoroughly researched and well-written journey through some of the key ideas in science and the real stories behind their development.”

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Science writer Lauren Redniss takes us on a most meditative, enchanting, and perilous journey via her prose and with her stunning artwork in Thunder & Lightning: Weather Past, Present, Futu

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“If you are unfamiliar with the increasing impact of solar energy in America, Harness the Sun should quickly bring you up to speed.”

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