Nonfiction

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“threads of When Women Ruled the World make up a history of women not just as rulers but as women who were rulers. . . .”

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“. . . Cervantes describes the exploring, the diplomatic activity, the rivalries, the fighting, and the personalities with delicious granularity.”

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“The premise that cognition and consciousness are traits that arise not solely from the brain but also involve the body, or soma (as in the common word ‘somatic’), is not new.”

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In Stone the Saints: Poems of an Igbo Son, Onuoha does not venture far from traditional literary resources to bring into focus the reality of the Igbo people and their role in the

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Paris is a good idea anytime—especially when you have Marin Montagut as your tour guide through a city that defines style, fashion, history, and imagination.

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“show[s] us the panoply of underpinnings (psychological, sociological, philosophical, and biological) that support this fear of the new, the different, and the ‘other.’”

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Some stories are hard to believe, and this is one of them.

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The humorist S. J. Perelman (1904–1979) was an American original. His work has sat little-noticed in a Fireside trade paperback edition for years.

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“a story of the famous Daniel Boone that stands on just its facts, and yet the storytelling has the same quality that has made Pearl’s historical fiction so popular.”

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“Schuller has produced a work of impressive scholarship and research, from which many readers and students will benefit, though the rich and complex material she has assembled seems to dema

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“If there’s one book about music that deserves to be read cover to cover this year it’s Kelefa Sanneh’s Major Labels. It’s bound to be a contemporary classic.”

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For a century and a half, Confederate statesman and former US Senator Judah P. Benjamin was a source of pride to parochial Southern Jews who longed for regional legitimacy and validation.

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Dior and Roses is a commemorative catalogue for an exhibition that began in May of this year and will end at the end of October.

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Toward the end of the 1962 western The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, a character playing a newspaper man says, “When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.”

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“Kirby has created a book that is also a lit picture window into a world that looks a lot like this one, but is infinitely kinder, more gentle, more full of awe and wonder and love . .

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“beauty, rhythm, insight, resonance.”

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Two things are generally true about self-help books for general readership:

—Sex sells

—Only well-written books significantly guide the reader to successfully help themselves

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The Rage of Innocence is an important and timely book—an intelligent, compassionate, and indispensable argument on behalf of Black children.”

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This is a terrific book. You’re going to love it.”

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Sylvain Cypel argues forcefully for the moral bankruptcy of Israel in its treatment of Palestinians.

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“Shadmi’s deeply absorbing and moving biography will appeal to Dracula afficionados of all ages.”

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Gay, Catholic and American is a book about both past and ongoing struggles for LGBTQ+ equality, and reminds readers that these battles are important, even, and perhaps especially,

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a three-decades-long time capsule of the voices of the youth culture and what was on their minds . . .”

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“How history should be written . . . brilliant.”

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