Nonfiction

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“This is more than an introduction to Canetti, the thinker, the writer, the man. It’s a profound portrait of a creative talent and the times he lived in.”

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“Freedland enthusiastically makes his informal retelling of this story of a daring escape from a horror on an unimaginable scale a particular tale of high adventure.”

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“Dick Gregory was one of a kind, the genuine article.”

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The Blonds, David and Phillippe, should be more famous than they are. Their work is extraordinary. Their artistry is somewhere between haute couture and a Brazilian Mardis Gras float.

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Temple Grandin doesn’t write captivating prose. A reader who needs to be entertained may miss out on what Grandin has to offer.

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“Cleveland’s personal history offered no foreshadowing of future greatness.

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Folk Music is not a conventional biography, and readers hoping to find in it details of Bob Dylan’s personal life will have to search elsewhere.

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“This kind of self-awareness is a crucial ingredient for any memoir.

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“Glück has created a pièce de résistance. This is a collection of poetry not just worth reading. It is worth tasting, reviewing, scenting, savoring.”

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“A magnificent job of bringing this little-known history into the full glorious light where it belongs.”

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Joshua Frank’s ballsy tell-all of the Hanford pillaging of the American people’s pocketbooks, while as the same time, never achieving the one objective the government contractors were hired to do—e

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“Gerber, whose long practice of Buddhism has shaped much of his voluminous and illuminating body of poetry, has written a beautifully searching book that provides a space to meditate upon d

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By Hands Now Known makes an authoritative argument for reparations and restitution for the families and communities whose lives were destroyed by Jim Crow crimes, and for whom not

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“Anne Innis Dagg is a worthy subject for a picture book and this story may inspire readers to look for more information about her.”

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The author is a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the former editor of Foreign Policy.

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“There have been other books about the polygamist Mormons in Mexico, some of them first-hand accounts.

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“A duo of enabling events opened the door to the descent into legal unprofessionalism, starting with a Supreme Court decision that permitted lawyers to advertise, at least on a limited basi

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The End of Solitude is bright, readable, and absorbing—pure Deresiewicz.”

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“a rich resource . . . a brilliant and much-needed book.”

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“David McCullough’s Brave Companions is a welcome reminder of how history should be written.”

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“This volume will be of certain interest to anyone trying to examine what has changed in warfare and where these trends might for in the near future.”

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One reads Miguel Missé’s The Myth of the Wrong Body with growing excitement and thumping of the air not just because of one’s sympathy with its content, but also because of his sociologica

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Giuliani is a well-written, balanced, and unvarnished portrait of a public figure whose downfall will sadden most readers.”  

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“Beevor, who has written acclaimed books about the Second World War, presents a richly detailed account of the momentous four years of Russian history between 1917 and 1921.”

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Another cab driver, and it’s more questions about civil society on Mars, if there’s life on other planets (never mind the microbes), should we worry about an alien invasion, and why are we here on

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